Watch the scariest robot in the world jump over stuff automatically

Star Wars coming to this galaxy soon.

Fortune

It’s bad enough that Boston Dynamics has made a robotic cheetah that can run nearly 30 m.p.h. (48 km/h). Now MIT has its own cheetah-robot that can autonomously leap tall obstacles in a single bound. The robot uses lasers to see its environment, and the onboard computer uses a three-part algorithm to detect an obstacle, adjust its approach, then measure the appropriate jump trajectory. The entire process takes about 100 milliseconds. Right now the cheetah can clear hurdles as high as 18 in. (46 cm) at an average running speed of 5 m.p.h. (8 km/h).

MIT researchers are planning to demonstrate their cheetah’s abilities at the DARPA Robotics Challenge in June.

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North Atlantic Clam That Lives for Centuries Yields Insights on Cardiac Aging | NCCIH

The typical heart in aquatic invertebrate animals such as clams, oysters, and mussels has many strong similarities to the human heart. The Arctica islandica, or ocean quahog, is the longest-living, non-colony-dwelling animal ever identified; so far, the oldest identified specimen survived to age 508 (age is identified by counting shell growth rings).

via North Atlantic Clam That Lives for Centuries Yields Insights on Cardiac Aging | NCCIH.

Long-term Mortality Risk After Hyperglycemic Crisis Episodes in Geriatric Patients With Diabetes: A National Population-Based Cohort Study

Long-term Mortality Risk After Hyperglycemic Crisis Episodes in Geriatric Patients With Diabetes: A National Population-Based Cohort Study.

CONCLUSIONS – Patients with diabetes had a higher mortality risk after HCE during the first 6 years of follow-up. Referral for proper education, better access to medical care, effective communication with a health care provider, and control of comorbidities should be done immediately after HCE.