Type 2 Diabetes Remission Rates After Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass and Gastric Banding: Results of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery Study | Diabetes Care

CONCLUSIONS – Diabetes remission up to 3 years after RYGBP and LAGB was proportionally higher with increasing postsurgical weight loss. However, the nearly twofold greater weight loss–adjusted likelihood of diabetes remission in subjects undergoing RYGBP than LAGB suggests unique mechanisms contributing to improved glucose metabolism beyond weight loss after RYGBP.

Source: Type 2 Diabetes Remission Rates After Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass and Gastric Banding: Results of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery Study | Diabetes Care

Not Just the 1%: Upper Middle Class Is Larger & Richer – The Big Picture

Interesting data point — its not just the top 1% who are thriving, nor just the top 0.1%, who are really killing it — but the Upper Middle Class is doing well also. According to an Urban Institute paper, The Growing Size and Incomes of the Upper Middle Class using absolute income thresholds [adjusted for inflation and family…Read More

Source: Not Just the 1%: Upper Middle Class Is Larger & Richer – The Big Picture

Lily Tomlin — “The trouble with being in the rat race is that even if you win, you’re still a rat.”

I suspect you’ll start seeing more press about this study in the coming weeks.  I followed the link to the Urban Institute and downloaded the paper.  I pretty much stopped reading the paper when the author wrote,

The study did not adjust for regional differences in the cost of living…Not using area price differences certainly means that some families were incorrectly categorized in this five-level class structure. However, inaccurately placing people from Washington, DC, as upper middle class because they have incomes just above $100,000, even though they have high local costs and would not generally be considered as being upper middle class in that location, is offset by categorizing Des Moines, IA, families with incomes just below $100,000 as being middle class, even though those families could be considered upper middle class because costs in their area are low. Because the point of this exercise was to determine large changes in social classes, any bias one way or the other should not be large.

Talk about a fatal flaw in methodology.  Add in the faulty assumption that “…any bias one way or the other should not be large” and you have IMHO a study that is worthless.

Tell me, how can you be “upper middle class” solely by income level if you have the cost of living in Manhattan, Miami, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, or Seattle?

Here’s another critic of the study:

Source: oftwominds-Charles Hugh Smith: What Does It take to Be Upper Middle Class?

 

 

 

Clinical Toxicology Interviews – Taylor & Francis Online

Source: Clinical Toxicology Interviews | Taylor & Francis Online

Audio interview with Dr. Doyon (bystander naloxone)
listen to audio file | mp3 | 18’20”
Read the transcript | pdf

Audio interview with Ms. Priyanka (e-cigarettes)
listen to audio file | mp3 | 10’45”
Read the transcript | pdf

Audio interview with Dr. Doyon (acetaminophen fatalities)
listen to audio file | mp3 | 10’51”
Read the transcript | pdf

Audio interview with Dr. Lipshultz (energy drinks)
listen to audio file | mp3 | 7’35”
Read the transcript | pdf

Audio interview with Dr. Benson (gastric lavage)
listen to audio file | mp3 | 14’32”
Read the transcript | pdf

Have fun and enjoy the interviews.

Decline of the American Dream

We analyzed the cost of living and median income levels in 74 U.S. cities to find out where you can still obtain the American Dream across the country.

Source: Decline of the American Dream

Nice set of info-graphics if you’re into that method of data comprehension.

Did I mention I live and work in Oklahoma?  Check out The Housing Trilemma from an earlier post.