Resistance Training Tied to Lower Risk for Metabolic Syndrome — Physician’s First Watch

After adjustment for potential confounders like aerobic exercise levels, doing any resistance exercise was associated with lower risk for metabolic syndrome, compared with no resistance training (hazard ratio, 0.83). People who met guidelines for recommended amounts of both resistance exercise (≥2 days/wk) and aerobic exercise (≥500 metabolic equivalent min/wk) had a 25% lower risk for metabolic syndrome than those who didn’t hit the recommended amounts.

Source: Resistance Training Tied to Lower Risk for Metabolic Syndrome — Physician’s First Watch

Link to the original article below.

Source: Association of Resistance Exercise, Independent of and Combined With Aerobic Exercise, With the Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome – Mayo Clinic Proceedings

Change in Diet Can Lower Mortality Risk

A worsening diet over the course of 12 years was associated with an increased mortality of 6% to 12%, the researchers found.  Those who stayed consistently on a healthy diet starting at baseline had a 9% to 14% lower risk for death than those who stayed consistently on a poor diet.

Source: Change in Diet Can Lower Mortality Risk

Source: Association of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality — NEJM

 

Healthy Lifestyle May Increase Lifespan by 7 Years

Current US life expectancy is 78 years for men and 82 years for women, but for the low-risk group in this study, life expectancies were 85 and 89 years, respectively.

Source: Healthy Lifestyle May Increase Lifespan by 7 Years

Source: A healthy lifestyle increases life expectancy by up to seven years: Maintaining a normal weight, not smoking, and drinking alcohol at moderate levels are factors that add healthy years to life — ScienceDaily

I should have saved more, invested better, and not spent so much money on the kids.

Fried potato consumption is associated with elevated mortality: an 8-y longitudinal cohort study

Source: Fried potato consumption is associated with elevated mortality: an 8-y longitudinal cohort study

Results: Of the 4400 participants, 2551 (57.9%) were women with a mean ± SD age of 61.3 ± 9.2 y. During the 8-y follow-up, 236 participants died. After adjustment for 14 potential baseline confounders, and taking those with the lowest consumption of potatoes as the reference group, participants with the highest consumption of potatoes did not show an increased risk of overall mortality (HR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.91). However, subgroup analyses indicated that participants who consumed fried potatoes 2–3 times/wk (HR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.11, 3.41) and ≥3 times/wk (HR: 2.26; 95% CI: 1.15, 4.47) were at an increased risk of mortality. The consumption of unfried potatoes was not associated with an increased mortality risk.

Conclusions: The frequent consumption of fried potatoes appears to be associated with an increased mortality risk.

The abstract indicates the researchers controlled for “14 confounders”.  Note the increased mortality impact was from a subgroup analysis.  Since I’m unwilling to pay $40 USD for the full study I’ll never know if the researchers controlled for triple cheeseburgers, eggs, bacon, sausage, fried fish,  or any other foods commonly consumed with fried potatoes.

Poutine???

Study finds tens of millions of Americans drink alcohol at dangerously high levels – National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Nearly 32 million adults in the United States (13 percent of the U.S. population aged 18 and older) consumed more than twice the number of drinks considered binge drinking on at least one occasion, according to a 2013 survey that asked about past-year drinking. This higher level of drinking is associated with increased health and safety risks. A report of the findings is online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (link is external). The study was conducted by researchers at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Source: Study finds tens of millions of Americans drink alcohol at dangerously high levels | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

This is depressing.  I need another beer.

White Meats Carry Lower Mortality Risks than Reds, But We Eat Too Much of Both — Physician’s First Watch

Source: White Meats Carry Lower Mortality Risks than Reds, But We Eat Too Much of Both — Physician’s First Watch

Source: Mortality from different causes associated with meat, heme iron, nitrates, and nitrites in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study: population based cohort study | The BMJ

I’m feeling guilty about the three cheddar cheeseburger sliders I had last night.

Guess I’ll have another beer.