Covid-19 Buzz Cut – Day One – 03.29.20

I am back in my home office learning and sharing about shelter in place.  Yesterday my son helped me cut my hair.  He’s been cutting his own hair since medical school.  As the doctor inspected my work he said,

“You missed a few spots.”

So he finished up what I started.

Today I researched “essential” businesses.

Barbershops are not considered “essential”

I expected this hence the shelter in place buzz cut.

Yes, it’s real short.  Top view.

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Backside view.

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New to WFH? Read This Article

How to maintain your mental health while working from home

Pretty good article online at Fast Company.

I’ve been working from home since 2006.  As a result social distancing and hoarding come naturally now.  The article has several good suggestions and well worth reading.

Personally I would add one more suggestion to the list: your favorite music.  Today is a Willie Day.

Why Toilet Paper? — RadaJonesMD

I roll in my bed, unable to sleep. I listen to BBC talk about the craziness that took over the world, preoccupied with this one question. What question? It’s not: “Why, Corona?” For that, I already have more answers than I want. Scientists say that COVID19 is an animal virus. It spread to humans from…

via Why Toilet Paper? — RadaJonesMD

What does cable news do to your brain?

What does cable news do to your brain? A neurosurgeon explains.

The availability of up to the minute information, presented 24/7/365, could assist a democratic society in making the best choices in determining its future. That was the promise of cable news. Unfortunately, cable news has fallen short of its potential and has led to the further polarization of America. More than that, it has changed the way your brain works.

Does cable news change how your brain works?

Possibly.  But I take no chances.  I don’t watch cable news networks.

Daddy always told me you go to college so that they can teach you how to think.

Unfortunately nowadays institutions of higher “education” teach the young what to think, not how to think.

Think about this for a while.

If you can.

 

Older Age Suicide

Across the country, suicide rates have been on the rise, and that rise has struck the nation’s seniors particularly hard. Of the more than 47,000 suicides that took place in 2017, those 65 and up accounted for more than 8,500 of them, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Men who are 65 and older face the highest risk of suicide, while adults 85 and older, regardless of gender, are the second most likely age group to die from suicide.

Isolated And Struggling, Many Seniors Are Turning To Suicide

Screenshot_2019-07-27 Isolated And Struggling, Many Seniors Are Turning To Suicide(1)