The Silent Pandemic

There are no quick-fix solutions, as obesity is not an external problem. It is an internal metabolic issue.

Dr. Rita Nawar Tobias

Interesting article on a weight care clinic in Dubai.  This article is worth five minutes of your time.

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Dr. Robert Lustig – The Sugar Pandemic – 2012 Presentation at Yale University

You think you know something until you start asking questions to seek the truth.  Quite a few followers liked my post of Dr. Lustig’s TedX speech.  Here are some videos of Dr. Lustig’s presentation at Yale in 2012 for those who want to dig a little deeper on the topic of sugar.

Daily Weighing may be Key to Losing Weight

Researchers identified several categories of self-weighing adults, from those that weighed themselves daily or almost daily to adults who never used at-home scales.

They found that people who never weighed themselves or only weighed once a week did not lose weight in the following year. Those that weighed themselves six to seven times a week had a significant weight loss (1.7 percent) in 12 months.

Link to source article.

184.4

Yes, I weigh myself almost every day.

Yes it’s been over 40 years since I lost 200 pounds.

Yes!

No consistent evidence of a disproportionately low resting energy expenditure in long-term successful weight-loss maintainers

Conclusions

We found no consistent evidence of a significantly lower REE than predicted in a sample of long-term WLMs based on predictive equations developed from NCs and OCs as well as 3 standard predictive equations. Results suggest that sustained weight loss may not always result in a substantial, disproportionately low REE.

Full abstract can be found here.

I feel so much better now.

 

Early-life obesity impacts children’s learning and memory

A new study by Brown University epidemiologists found that children on the threshold of obesity or overweight in the first two years of life had lower perceptual reasoning and working memory scores than lean children when tested at ages five and eight. The study also indicated that IQ scores may be lower for higher-weight children.

“Excess early-life adiposity was associated with lower IQ, perceptual reasoning and working memory scores at school-age,” Li said.

The authors pointed out that the sample size of their study was limited and that further studies should be conducted to confirm their findings. Future work could also investigate the impact of early-life weight status on school performance, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnoses and special education use.

If these study results hold up in future studies then I’ll know just what the hell happened to me.