Counterfeit Prescription Drugs Laced With Fentanyl Falling Into Unsuspecting Hands Thanks In Part To Social Media — Kaiser Health News

People buying drugs like Xanax online are taking the pills, not realizing that they are fake and some are tainted with a potent opioid. The mistake can be fatal. 26 more words

via Counterfeit Prescription Drugs Laced With Fentanyl Falling Into Unsuspecting Hands Thanks In Part To Social Media — Kaiser Health News

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Revisiting Who Should Take Aspirin

The Skeptical Cardiologist weighs in on the aspirin debate.
Thank you Dr. Pearson.

The Skeptical Cardiologist

Four years ago the skeptical cardiologist wrote the (in his extremely humble  and biased opinion) the definitive post on aspirin and cardiovascular disease.  Entitled “Should I take aspirin to prevent stroke or heart attack“,  it pointed out that although Dr. Oz had recently told almost all middle-aged women to take a baby aspirin and fish oil, there was, in fact no evidence to support that practice.

The publication of the ASPREE (Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly) trial results in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine further strengthens the points I made in 2014.

Between 2010 and 2014 the ASPREE investigators enrolled over 19,000 community-dwelling persons in Australia and the United States who were 70 years of age or older (or ≥65 years of age among blacks and Hispanics in the United States) and did not have cardiovascular disease, dementia, or disability.

(It’s important…

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Daily low-dose aspirin found to have no effect on healthy life span in older people

In the total study population, treatment with 100 mg of low-dose aspirin per day did not affect survival free of dementia or disability. Among the people randomly assigned to take aspirin, 90.3 percent remained alive at the end of the treatment without persistent physical disability or dementia, compared with 90.5 percent of those taking a placebo. Rates of physical disability were similar, and rates of dementia were almost identical in both groups.

For the full NIH news release click here.

Is Your Generic Medication Made In China and Is It Safe?

Important must read.

The Skeptical Cardiologist

Last week the FDA recalled several versions of the generic blood pressure medication valsartan which were made in China and contained a carcinogen (see here.)

Since then I  have switched many patients from the bad valsartan to losartan or valsartan from presumably safe manufacturers.

It didn’t really occur to me that this could be just the tip of the iceberg until I received a reader comment which I will copy below.

As I thought about it, I realized that I have no idea where the generic ramipril I am taking is manufactured. It very well could be in China or India.

This recent article from The Epoch Times confirms that Americans are becoming more and more reliant on medications manufactured in China and that many researchers feel this poses a significant security threat.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is inspecting only a small number of the Chinese companies…

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Walmart is Big Brother is Amazon

This whole surveillance state thing is just plain creepy.

It is perfectly clear that patients are going to get some kind of a grade from The Walmart Enforcement Agency and you’d better believe that there will be consequences if that grade isn’t good. Good luck getting a legal prescription filled there if you don’t make the grade. Pharmacies around the country are already arbitrarily deciding who does or does not get their scripts filled. Although is not explicitly stated it a pretty safe bet that patients could be refused prescriptions because of their score doesn’t meet Walmart’s “standards.”

I wonder what George Orwell would say.

Read the article here.

Experts Say Keep Amazon’s Alexa Away From Your Kids

Hey Alexa.  Brainwash my children.

Hey Alexa, What Are You Doing to My Kid’s Brain?

Hey Alexa.  What are you doing to my kid’s brain?

Fifteen percent of osteoporosis patients who take ‘drug holidays’ suffer bone fractures

A Loyola Medicine study has found that 15.4 percent of patients who take so-called “drug holidays” from osteoporosis drugs called bisphosphonates experienced bone fractures. During a six-year follow-up period, the yearly incidence of fractures ranged from 3.7 percent to 9.9 percent, with the most fractures occurring during the fourth and fifth years.

The study by senior author Pauline Camacho, MD, and colleagues was published in the journal Endocrine Practice.

Read the source article here.