Slow Walking Indicator of Heart-Related Death

Source: Slow Walking Indicator of Heart-Related Death, Study Finds | American Council on Science and Health

Earlier articles with walking-speed vs death association:
2015:
“5 year mortality predictors in 498 103 UK Biobank participants: a prospective population-based study”. Excerpts related to walking:
– Self-reported health and walking pace were the strongest predictors in both sexes and across different causes of deaths.
– Our findings suggest that measures that can be simply obtained by verbal interview without physical examination (eg, self-reported health and walking pace) are the strongest predictors of all-cause mortality.
http://www.thelancet.com/jo…

2013
“Association of walking speed in late midlife with mortality: results from the Whitehall II cohort study.”:
– Slow walking speed is associated with increased mortality in the elderly, but it is unknown whether a similar association is present in late midlife. Our aim was to examine walking speed in late midlife as a predictor of mortality, as well as factors that may explain this association.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.go…

Hat Tip and thanks to fellow reader John H. Newcomb who provided the quotes and links above in the comments section from the original article.

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Abdominal Aortic Calcification Among Individuals With and Without Diabetes: The Jackson Heart Study

In the Jackson Heart Study (JHS), we examined the association of diabetes with abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) among African Americans. Among included individuals (n = 1,664), the mean age was 57 (± 11) years, 69% were female, and 18.3% had diabetes (based on fasting blood glucose [FBG], HbA1c, use of glucose-lowering medications, or physician diagnosis). The median AAC and coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores were 904.15 (interquartile range 0–1093.10) and 0 (0–96.19), respectively. The prevalence of any AAC or CAC was 69% and 49%, respectively. Individuals with diabetes were older, had higher BMI, had higher systolic blood pressure and prevalence of hypertension, had lower HDL levels, were less affluent or physically active, had poorer nutritional intake, and had higher levels of hs-CRP.

Source: Diabetes Care

Atrial Fibrillation – Circulation Research

Source: Atrial Fibrillation | Circulation Research

Abstract

The past 3 decades have been characterized by an exponential growth in knowledge and advances in the clinical treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). It is now known that AF genesis requires a vulnerable atrial substrate and that the formation and composition of this substrate may vary depending on comorbid conditions, genetics, sex, and other factors. Population-based studies have identified numerous factors that modify the atrial substrate and increase AF susceptibility. To date, genetic studies have reported 17 independent signals for AF at 14 genomic regions. Studies have established that advanced age, male sex, and European ancestry are prominent AF risk factors. Other modifiable risk factors include sedentary lifestyle, smoking, obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, and elevated blood pressure predispose to AF, and each factor has been shown to induce structural and electric remodeling of the atria. Both heart failure and myocardial infarction increase risk of AF and vice versa creating a feed-forward loop that increases mortality. Other cardiovascular outcomes attributed to AF, including stroke and thromboembolism, are well established, and epidemiology studies have championed therapeutics that mitigate these adverse outcomes. However, the role of anticoagulation for preventing dementia attributed to AF is less established. Our review is a comprehensive examination of the epidemiological data associating unmodifiable and modifiable risk factors for AF and of the pathophysiological evidence supporting the mechanistic link between each risk factor and AF genesis. Our review also critically examines the epidemiological data on clinical outcomes attributed to AF and summarizes current evidence linking each outcome with AF.

Race Ranks Higher than Pounds for South Asians, Hispanics – ScienceDaily

Americans of South Asian descent are twice as likely as whites to have risks for heart disease, stroke and diabetes, when their weight is in the normal range, according to a study headed by Emory University and UC San Francisco.

Similarly, Americans of Hispanic descent were 80 percent more likely than whites to suffer from so-called cardio-metabolic abnormalities that give rise to heart disease, stroke and diabetes, compared with 50 percent more likely for those who were Chinese and African-American.

These risks include high blood pressure (hypertension), elevated glucose, low HDL, the “good cholesterol,” and high triglycerides, a fat found in blood. In the study, participants who were aged between 45 and 84, were classified as having cardio-metabolic abnormalities if they had two or more of these four risk factors.

Source: Race ranks higher than pounds in diabetes, heart-health risks: South Asians, Hispanics of normal weight most likely to have high glucose, hypertension — ScienceDaily

Alcohol and the Heart: Moderation Still Best – Medpage Today

Source: Alcohol and the Heart: Moderation Still Best | Medpage Today

Source: Alcohol’s Link to Cardiovascular Disease Not So Simple — Physician’s First Watch

Source: Association between clinically recorded alcohol consumption and initial presentation of 12 cardiovascular diseases: population based cohort study using linked health records | The BMJ

Lifestyle Changes in Plain English:

If you don’t drink alcohol, start drinking to reduce your risk of cardiac diseases.

If you drink alcohol heavily, decrease consumption to reduce your risk of cardiac diseases.