The Fine Print of the Keto Diet: Harms and Failures

Thanks Dr. Joshi for the research and study links.

afternoonrounds

shutterstock_730538119 (1)

The keto diet has been widely promulgated as an effective therapy for the treatment of diabetes and weight loss with minimal side effects. Many discussions regarding the diet present an unbalanced view, often omitting studies that show harm or lack of a benefit. To balance the narrative, I’ve written this post that I intend to keep maintained for foreseeable future. Below I present the links to references of important studies that are often excluded from the discussion of ketogenic, and by association, low-carbohydrate diets. I invite you to look through them. Personally, I did not expect to find as much as I did (and certainly not so many concerning side effects). If you have other studies or comments, please post them below in the reply section of this page. You can also share them with me on Twitter @sjoshiMD.

  1. Claim that the Ketogenic Diet is Beneficial for Diabetes
    1. I’ve…

View original post 1,432 more words

Advertisements

Whey Better

While exercise buffs have long used protein supplements to gain muscle, new research from McMaster University suggests one protein source in particular, whey protein, is most effective for seniors struggling to rebuild muscle lost from inactivity associated with illness or long hospital stays.

Source article here.

Whole grains one of the most important food groups for preventing type 2 diabetes

The proportion who developed type 2 diabetes was lowest in the group which reported the highest wholegrain consumption, and increased for each group which had eaten less wholegrain. In the group with the highest wholegrain intake, the diabetes risk was 34 percent lower for men, and 22 percent lower for women, than in the group with the lowest wholegrain intake.

“It is unusual to be able to investigate such a large range when it comes to how much wholegrain people eat,” says Rikard Landberg. “If you divided American participants into 4 groups, the group that ate the most wholegrain would be the same level as the group that ate the least wholegrain in Denmark. In Europe, Scandinavia eats the most, Spain and Italy the least.”

Additionally, the study was uncommonly large, with 55,000 participants, over a long time span — 15 years.

My source article is here and the study abstract can be found here.

 

Low Carb Diets Are Bad

This study prospectively examined the relationship between low carbohydrate diets, all-cause death, and deaths from coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease (including stroke), and cancer in a nationally representative sample of 24,825 participants of the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 1999 to 2010. Compared to participants with the highest carbohydrate consumption, those with the lowest intake had a 32% higher risk of all-cause death over an average 6.4-year follow-up. In addition, risks of death from coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer were increased by 51%, 50%, and 35%, respectively.

The results were confirmed in a meta-analysis of seven prospective cohort studies with 447,506 participants and an average follow-up 15.6 years, which found 15%, 13%, and 8% increased risks in total, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality with low (compared to high) carbohydrate diets.

For the source article click this link.

 

 

The Myth of Super Foods

The successful selling of superfoods to the wealthy is creating an impression that premium foods and superfoods equal good health and that they are a necessary part of any effort to improve the healthiness of a diet.

Everything in the produce aisle is a superfood, the rest is just window dressing. We need to start there and insure everyone has access to these, the basics of a healthful diet.

A most interesting perspective on super faddish super foods.  The full article is worth reading and can be found here.

Yikes.

Drink More Coffee Live Longer? (not really)

Read this article or watch the video before you start knocking down a dozen cups of Joe to prolong your life.

if one observes a benefit in a population associated with consuming a food or beverage, and the benefit is not mediated by the active ingredient in that food or beverage, the finding is likely due to unmeasured confounding.  In other words, I think coffee is in the same camp as red wine: the observed benefits are likely due more to the type of person who drinks it than what’s actually in the drink.