Eat Nuts

Eating nuts linked with lower risk of fatal heart attack and stroke

Eating nuts two or more times per week was associated with a 17% lower risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to consuming nuts once every two weeks. The connection was robust even after adjusting for factors that could influence the relationship such as age, sex, education, smoking, and physical activity. Nut intake was inversely associated with the other outcomes but lost significance after adjustment.

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How the carnivore diet works. — Nutritional revolution

Reading Time: 5 minutes So apparently Paul Saladinos and Mikhaila Peterson have recently been talking about me on a podcast. I haven’t had a chance to listen to the podcast, and I probably won’t. But apparently it had something to do with my statements that the benefits of the carnivore diet are caused by calorie restriction. So I will…

via How the carnivore diet works. — Nutritional revolution

Some clear thinking on this topic and should be shared with anyone who has a firm unshakeable opinion in the superiority of their personal beliefs on the ideal human diet.

Thank you Kevin.

Plant Protein Linked to Longer Life

Plant Protein Linked to Longer Life

Link above is to NEJM Journal Watch article.

Conclusions and Relevance  In this large prospective study, higher plant protein intake was associated with lower total and CVD-related mortality. Although animal protein intake was not associated with mortality outcomes, replacement of red meat protein or processed meat protein with plant protein was associated with lower total, cancer-related, and CVD-related mortality.

JAMA Internal Medicine article (Free abstract)

Note: Study focused on Japanese adults.

Low-Fat Dietary Pattern among Postmenopausal Women Influences Long-Term Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Diabetes Outcomes

Conclusions

Reduction in dietary fat with corresponding increase in vegetables, fruit, and grains led to benefits related to breast cancer, CHD, and diabetes, without adverse effects, among healthy postmenopausal US women.

Source: Low-Fat Dietary Pattern among Postmenopausal Women Influences Long-Term Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Diabetes Outcomes

Eat More Fiber

According to Dr. Sadeghi, fiber-rich foods are generally enough to boost and maintain a healthy gut biome. While companies claim to have packaged the secret to digestion via fermented foods—such as yogurt, sauerkraut, kombucha, wine, and cheese—the truth is there is no recognized scientific evidence to support these claims. Dr. Sadeghi stated, “There are no studies which have actually looked at whether these probiotics get incorporated into the gut mucosa or get discarded into the stool. In fact, we don’t even know for sure they aren’t harmful. In a recent study published in Cell, researchers looked at whether probiotics get incorporated into the mucosa post antibiotic therapy to restore gut health.[1] They did colonoscopies on two groups of individuals and samples their biome. Both groups received antibiotics. One group received probiotics and the other group did not receive probiotics. They wanted to know whether taking probiotics restored the health of the gut faster. To their surprise, the group that didn’t get probiotics recovered the biome faster!”

Gastroenterologist Busts Link Between Fermented Dairy and Gut Health

Link to Dr. Angie Sadeghi’s website.

 

Plant-based sales surge to $4.5 billion

New data released by The Good Food Institute (G.F.I.) and the Plant-Based Foods Association (P.B.F.A.) show plant-based foods sales significantly outpaced overall grocery sales last year. U.S. retail sales of plant-based foods grew 11% — five times more than total food sales — bringing the total plant-based market to $4.5 billion.

Read the entire Food Business News article here.

Nutrition Labels — Do You Read Them?

The following is not an endorsement of either product but simply nutrition labels for educational purposes.  I am not compensated for my efforts on this blog.  DISCLAIMER:  I did download an app to my phone and got the burrito for FREE.

Both food products are meat free.  The burrito is prepared with cheese and sour cream.  The second Nutrition Facts represents a commercially prepared veggie burger, no bread or bun.

Screenshot_2019-07-03 DEL TACO

 

Screenshot_2019-07-09 All American Veggie Burgers Dr Praeger's Sensible Foods

Take Home Lesson:

  1. Fast food is fast food.  Even when it’s missing the meat.
  2. Add a bun.  Add some toppings.  Eating at home makes eating healthier easier.