Improving fruit and vegetable intake attenuates the genetic association with long-term weight gain

Conclusions

Genetically associated increased BMI and body weight could be mitigated by increasing fruit and vegetable intake, and the beneficial effect of improving fruit and vegetable intake on weight management was more pronounced in individuals with greater genetic susceptibility to obesity.

Improving fruit and vegetable intake attenuates the genetic association with long-term weight gain

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Obesity Linked to Nearly 6-fold Increased Risk of Developing type 2 Diabetes

The researchers found that having an unfavorable lifestyle and obesity are associated with a greater risk of developing T2D regardless of their genetic risk. Obesity (defined as a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher) increased T2D-risk by 5.8-fold compared to individuals with normal weight. The independent effects of high (vs. low) genetic risk and unfavourable (vs. favourable) lifestyle were relatively modest by comparison, with the highest genetic risk group having a 2-fold increased risk of developing T2D compared with the lowest group; and unfavourable lifestyle was associated with a 20% increased risk of developing T2D compared with favourable lifestyle.

Link to source article.

 

Want to Keep That Weight Off? (give up computers, video games, and television)

In the years following bariatric surgery, a person’s overall eating behaviors and the amount of time spent watching television, playing video games and using a computer for recreation are a better indication of long-term weight loss success than specific weight control practices like counting calories.

Reducing sedentary behavior; avoiding fast food; addressing problematic eating behaviors — including eating continuously, eating when full, loss of control and binge eating; and promoting self-weighing at least weekly were all behavioral targets the research team identified that patients should strive for and doctors should promote as part of post-surgical patient care.

Analysis identifies patients most at risk for weight regain after bariatric surgery

Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Spectrum of Disorders — Podcast

https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2727257/annals-call-nonalcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-spectrum-disorders

Audio. Annals On Call – Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Spectrum of Disorders: Dr. Centor discusses nonalcoholic fatty Liver disease with Dr. Meagan Gray, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Alabama.