Meat Intake and Colorectal Polyps

Meat Intake and Colorectal Polyps

Research professor of medicine Martha Shrubsole, Ph.D., and colleagues at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have published the first study to evaluate intakes of meat, cooking methods and meat mutagens and risk of developing sessile serrated polyps (SSPs, also called sessile serrated lesions). Shrubsole previously reported that consuming high levels of red meat increased the risk of developing all types of polyps, but that the likelihood of developing SSPs was two times greater than the risk of developing adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (HP).

Conventional colorectal adenomas are the precursor lesions for most colorectal cancers. SSPs, however, represent an alternative pathway to carcinogenesis that may account for up to 35 percent of colorectal cancers. Because a diagnostic consensus for SSPs was not reached until 2010, few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors.

 

Any Polyp Type Raises CRC Risk

A finding of any type of polyp in the colon increases the risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), according to new findings from a large Swedish study.

At 10 years, the cumulative colorectal cancer incidence was 1.6% among patients with hyperplastic polyps, 2.5% among those with sessile serrated polyps, 2.7% for tubular adenomas, 5.1% for tubulovillous adenomas, and 8.6% for villous adenomas, as compared with 2.1% for the control group.

However, a higher risk for colorectal-related death was only observed in patients with sessile serrated polyps, tubulovillous adenomas, or villous adenomas.

The study was published online March 16 in Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

Any Type of Polyp Increases the Risk for Colorectal Cancer

Boldface sections are mine.

I had my first virtual visit with my physician yesterday.  I mentioned that I was postponing my colonoscopy this year for pandemic reasons.  She said that’s fine, don’t worry about it.  I read this article today.  Now I know why I’m on a three year callback.

 

Covid-19 Buzz Cut – Day One – 03.29.20

I am back in my home office learning and sharing about shelter in place.  Yesterday my son helped me cut my hair.  He’s been cutting his own hair since medical school.  As the doctor inspected my work he said,

“You missed a few spots.”

So he finished up what I started.

Today I researched “essential” businesses.

Barbershops are not considered “essential”

I expected this hence the shelter in place buzz cut.

Yes, it’s real short.  Top view.

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Backside view.

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Step It Up!

Previous studies have been done on step counts and mortality. However, they were conducted primarily with older adults or among people with debilitating chronic conditions. This study tracked a representative sample of U.S. adults aged 40 and over; approximately 4,800 participants wore accelerometers for up to seven days between 2003 and 2006. The participants were then followed for mortality through 2015 via the National Death Index. The researchers calculated associations between mortality and step number and intensity after adjustment for demographic and behavioral risk factors, body mass index, and health status at the start of the study.

They found that, compared with taking 4,000 steps per day, a number considered to be low for adults, taking 8,000 steps per day was associated with a 51% lower risk for all-cause mortality (or death from all causes). Taking 12,000 steps per day was associated with a 65% lower risk compared with taking 4,000 steps. In contrast, the authors saw no association between step intensity and risk of death after accounting for the total number of steps taken per day.

Higher daily step count linked with lower all-cause mortality

I am so screwed.

Gut Check! Two Mediterranean Diet Studies

In conclusion, these two outstanding studies support the fact that (1) it is not the quantity of calories per se that matters but the quality of the diet and (2) even in subjects of advanced age, adherence to a MedDiet is rapidly associated with different metabolic effects and reduced disease risk factors.

Mediterranean diet, gut microbiota and health: when age and calories do not add up!

 

This is Not About YOU

BLOG 2020 Covie

But I’m Not Even Sick!

If you’re experiencing mild symptoms that feel like a typical common cold, or you don’t even have symptoms at all, it’s probably hard to understand the importance of staying home. We understand and want to stress that this is not about YOU.

It is about your grandparents.

It is about your aunt with high blood pressure and Type 2 diabetes.

It is about the volunteers in the nursery at your place of worship.

It is about the hourly workers still making your coffee.

It is about the healthcare workers who continue to put themselves in harm’s way.

We are asking all of our Oklahomans to be good neighbors.

  • Limit your time out and about in the community to just the essentials.
  • Observe social distancing guidelines. If you are waiting in line to pick up necessities at the grocery store, or need to pay for gas at the gas station, keep your distance from the next person in line, or ask the person behind you to take a few steps back if you need to.
  • Practice good personal hygiene. Any time you interact with members outside of your own household, remember to wash your hands or use hand sanitizer when you return home.
  • Pay attention to your surroundings. Are you in a crowded room with elderly? Is it hard to walk in between people to get to the counter? If you or someone you love is at higher risk, remove yourself from that situation.

While data continues to become available to help medical experts understand how COVID-19 is being spread, we know our best weapon is personal responsibility. Let’s make future generations proud of how we worked together to mitigate a public health crisis. Let’s serve as leaders in responding with empathy, compassion and respect for our neighbors.