A Patient’s Journey: Learning to Eat Right – Medpage Today

The bottom line, from heart disease to prostate cancer and diabetes, is to fight inflammation by adjusting your diet.

Source: A Patient’s Journey: Learning to Eat Right | Medpage Today

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The New Reality of Old Age in America – Washington Post

retirement

Source: The new reality of old age in America – Washington Post

The present standard of retiring somewhere between ages 60 and 70 is not going to be sustainable when half the population lives to 80 or 90 – which is already realistic today – let alone 100 or more. It’s just not possible. If you’re like me, you don’t intend to retire at 70 or maybe not at all, but it’s nice to know we have the option. Future generations won’t.

John Mauldin

I refuse to extrapolate the stories of two families profiled in the linked Washington Post article but will readily admit the author may be on to something.  The cartoon was not part of the article but ran in my local newspaper’s Sunday Comics.  So I put the two together and the picture is anything but funny.

So what happens when you  look at sales figures for RV’s in the US?  Yeah…wow.

I guess it’s pretty tough out there for some.  The sad thing is it’s going to get a lot tougher.

The Retirement Myth.  It’s a new hashtag.

I found some pretty sound advice here.  Scroll down to the bottom of the article.

 

Nutritional Update for Physicians: Plant-Based Diets

A plant-based diet is not an all-or-nothing program, but a way of life that is tailored to each individual. It may be especially beneficial for those with obesity, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, lipid disorders, or cardiovascular disease. The benefits realized will be relative to the level of adherence and the amount of animal products consumed. Strict forms of plant-based diets with little or no animal products may be needed for individuals with inoperable or severe coronary artery disease. Low-sodium, plant-based diets may be prescribed for individuals with high blood pressure or a family history of coronary artery disease or stroke. A patient with obesity and diabetes will benefit from a plant-based diet that includes a moderate amount of fruits and vegetables and minimal low-fat animal products. Severe obesity may require counseling and initial management with a low-calorie diet or very-low-calorie diet and the supervision of a physician’s team. Patients with kidney disease may need a plant-based diet with special restrictions, for example fruits and vegetables that are high in potassium and phosphorus. Finally, patients with thyroid disease will need to be careful when consuming plants that are mild goitrogens, like soy, raw cruciferous vegetables, sweet potatoes, and corn. These patients should be informed that cooking these vegetables inactivates the goitrogens.

Source: Nutritional Update for Physicians: Plant-Based Diets

Social isolation, loneliness could be greater threat to public health than obesity – ScienceDaily

To illustrate the influence of social isolation and loneliness on the risk for premature mortality, Holt-Lunstad presented data from two meta-analyses. The first involved 148 studies, representing more than 300,000 participants, and found that greater social connection is associated with a 50 percent reduced risk of early death. The second study, involving 70 studies representing more than 3.4 million individuals primarily from North America but also from Europe, Asia and Australia, examined the role that social isolation, loneliness or living alone might have on mortality. Researchers found that all three had a significant and equal effect on the risk of premature death, one that was equal to or exceeded the effect of other well-accepted risk factors such as obesity.

Source: Social isolation, loneliness could be greater threat to public health than obesity — ScienceDaily

Get off your damn phone, get out of the house and go do something with your family and friends.

Change in Diet Can Lower Mortality Risk

A worsening diet over the course of 12 years was associated with an increased mortality of 6% to 12%, the researchers found.  Those who stayed consistently on a healthy diet starting at baseline had a 9% to 14% lower risk for death than those who stayed consistently on a poor diet.

Source: Change in Diet Can Lower Mortality Risk

Source: Association of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality — NEJM