What does cable news do to your brain?

What does cable news do to your brain? A neurosurgeon explains.

The availability of up to the minute information, presented 24/7/365, could assist a democratic society in making the best choices in determining its future. That was the promise of cable news. Unfortunately, cable news has fallen short of its potential and has led to the further polarization of America. More than that, it has changed the way your brain works.

Does cable news change how your brain works?

Possibly.  But I take no chances.  I don’t watch cable news networks.

Daddy always told me you go to college so that they can teach you how to think.

Unfortunately nowadays institutions of higher “education” teach the young what to think, not how to think.

Think about this for a while.

If you can.

 

Living Large

Do the People Who Live in This House Have the Right to Be “Struggling”?

It is a nice house, but not an extravagant one. It sits next to a house in disrepair, and another house that is kept up. If you notice, there are two doors. The address 196 Lefferts Place, Brooklyn, New York, is divided into two homes, and the house I am talking about is Unit B, consisting of the upper floors of the structure. The cost to be the proud owner of 196 Lefferts Place, Unit B, is $1.395 million.

The greater fool theory in the US residential real estate market.

Have I mentioned lately why I live in Oklahoma?

How the carnivore diet works. — Nutritional revolution

Reading Time: 5 minutes So apparently Paul Saladinos and Mikhaila Peterson have recently been talking about me on a podcast. I haven’t had a chance to listen to the podcast, and I probably won’t. But apparently it had something to do with my statements that the benefits of the carnivore diet are caused by calorie restriction. So I will…

via How the carnivore diet works. — Nutritional revolution

Some clear thinking on this topic and should be shared with anyone who has a firm unshakeable opinion in the superiority of their personal beliefs on the ideal human diet.

Thank you Kevin.

Another Reason Why I Live in Oklahoma

Priced Out 2019.08.21hk

Image Credit:  “A Generation Without A Future”: Millennials Struggle To Survive In Modern Hong Kong

While reading this article the graphic reproduced above caught my eye.

OKC is mentioned!  I seem to recall blogging about this affordability gap here, here, here, and here.

I guess HK is out of my retirement plans.

Plant‐Based Diets Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Disease Mortality, and All‐Cause Mortality in a General Population of Middle‐Aged Adults

Plant‐Based Diets Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Disease Mortality, and All‐Cause Mortality in a General Population of Middle‐Aged Adults

In this community‐based cohort of US adults without cardiovascular disease at baseline, we found that higher adherence to an overall plant‐based diet or a pro-vegetarian diet, diets that are higher in plant foods and lower in animal foods, was associated with a lower risk of incident cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all‐cause mortality. Healthy plant‐based diets, which are higher in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, tea, and coffee and lower in animal foods, were associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and all‐cause mortality.

Our study is one of the few studies that used data from a general population. Prospective studies of Seventh‐Day Adventists in the United States and Canada found that vegetarians had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and all‐cause mortality compared with nonvegetarians.4 The EPIC (European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition)‐Oxford study of vegetarians, vegans, and health‐conscious individuals reported that the risk of incident ischemic heart disease and deaths caused by circulatory disease was lower in vegetarians than nonvegetarians.5, 24 However, these findings were not replicated in population‐based studies in Australia and the United States.6, 13 Notably, a prior study that used data from a nationally representative sample administered a brief questionnaire that assessed the frequency with which participants consumed specific types of animal food (red meat, processed meat, poultry, or fish or seafood) to characterize participants’ dietary intakes.6 Such dietary measurement may not have adequately represented dietary patterns on the basis of abundance of plant foods relative to animal foods. The plant‐based diet indexes we used in this study captured a wider spectrum of intake of plant foods and animal foods, leveraging the available dietary data, and allowed us to move away from defining plant‐based diets strictly based on exclusion of animal foods.