The Great College Loan Swindle

America as a country has evolved in recent decades into a confederacy of widescale industrial scams. The biggest slices of our economic pie – sectors like health care, military production, banking, even commercial and residential real estate – have become crude income-redistribution schemes, often untethered from the market by subsidies or bailouts, with the richest companies benefiting from gamed or denuded regulatory systems that make profits almost as assured as taxes. Guaranteed-profit scams – that’s the last thing America makes with any level of consistent competence.

Going to college doesn’t guarantee a good job, far from it, but the data show that not going dooms most young people to an increasingly shallow pool of the very crappiest, lowest-paying jobs. There’s a lot of stick, but not much carrot, in the education game.

An interesting point of view and well worth reading.  Click here for the full Rolling Stone article.

 

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The Upsides and Downsides of Telecommuting

Workers who “telecommute” appear to have a lot more job satisfaction than folks who report to an office every day.  But that positive comes with trade-offs. Remote employees may also have a harder time separating work from their personal lives, and they can become socially isolated.

Source: The Upsides and Downsides of Telecommuting

Friends?  The wine shop manager, grocery store employees, and staff at the YMCA.

No, I’m not socially isolated.

Americans Are Retiring Later, Dying Sooner and Sicker In-Between – Bloomberg

Here are the stats: The U.S. age-adjusted mortality rate—a measure of the number of deaths per year—rose 1.2 percent from 2014 to 2015, according to the Society of Actuaries. That’s the first year-over-year increase since 2005, and only the second rise greater than 1 percent since 1980.

Source: Americans Are Retiring Later, Dying Sooner and Sicker In-Between – Bloomberg

Yikes!

Use Spare Older Workers to Overcome ‘Labour Shortages’ – naked capitalism

Rather than relying on mass immigration to fill phantom ‘labour shortages’ – in turn displacing both young and older workers alike – the more sensible policy option is to moderate immigration and instead better utilise the existing workforce as well as use automation to overcome any loss of workers as the population ages – as has been utilised in Japan.

Source: Use Spare Older Workers to Overcome ‘Labour Shortages’ | naked capitalism

The referenced article describes the situation in Australia but is a worthwhile read for those of us in the US.

“Spare older workers”.  I like that.

The New Reality of Old Age in America – Washington Post

retirement

Source: The new reality of old age in America – Washington Post

The present standard of retiring somewhere between ages 60 and 70 is not going to be sustainable when half the population lives to 80 or 90 – which is already realistic today – let alone 100 or more. It’s just not possible. If you’re like me, you don’t intend to retire at 70 or maybe not at all, but it’s nice to know we have the option. Future generations won’t.

John Mauldin

I refuse to extrapolate the stories of two families profiled in the linked Washington Post article but will readily admit the author may be on to something.  The cartoon was not part of the article but ran in my local newspaper’s Sunday Comics.  So I put the two together and the picture is anything but funny.

So what happens when you  look at sales figures for RV’s in the US?  Yeah…wow.

I guess it’s pretty tough out there for some.  The sad thing is it’s going to get a lot tougher.

The Retirement Myth.  It’s a new hashtag.

I found some pretty sound advice here.  Scroll down to the bottom of the article.

 

Our Minds Have Been Hijacked by Our Phones – WIRED

Source: Our Minds Have Been Hijacked by Our Phones. Tristan Harris Wants to Rescue Them | WIRED

Technology steers what 2 billion people are thinking and believing every day. It’s possibly the largest source of influence over 2 billion people’s thoughts that has ever been created. Religions and governments don’t have that much influence over people’s daily thoughts. But we have three technology companies who have this system that frankly they don’t even have control over—with newsfeeds and recommended videos and whatever they put in front of you—which is governing what people do with their time and what they’re looking at.

I’ll be the first to admit I spend a lot of time online.  But I pretty much avoid most social media sites.  Stopped using FaceBorg.  Instagram to catch the occasional post from one of the kids.  A little Twitter for news.  LinkedIn rarely.  It wasn’t hard for me to recognize mass brainwashing.  Not to mention addiction.

One of my more popular posts was a link to this Atlantic article.

But many of you never clicked through to read the article.  I do hope you take the time to read this Wired article.  It will make you think long and hard about your use of technology.

Think about what would happen if you shut off some of these apps that keep dinging you for attention?  This happens.