Nutrition 2018: New data confirm health benefits of plant-based diet

We present some top-line findings from these studies below. When reading these summaries, it is important to bear in mind that while the abstracts presented at Nutrition 2018 were evaluated and selected by a committee of experts, the papers have not undergone the same rigorous standard of peer review that is applied to scientific journals.

So, we should consider these findings as “preliminary results,” until they are properly assessed.

Read the abstracts at this link.

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People with family history of alcoholism release more dopamine in expectation of alcohol

People with a family history of alcohol use disorder (AUD) release more dopamine in the brain’s main reward center in response to the expectation of alcohol than people diagnosed with the disorder, or healthy people without any family history of AUD, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.

This explains a lot.

Read about this small interesting study here.

Meat Company Finds Americans Are Afraid of Hot Dogs

Meat brand Applegate finds that 47 percent of consumers are scared to discover the ingredients in hot dogs, while 24 percent of millennials never purchase them.

Read the survey results here.

I find surveys like this amusing.  Interview 1000 people and extrapolate the findings to all Americans.  The click bait title is great too.  It’s so misleading I had to copy it verbatim.

Early-life obesity impacts children’s learning and memory

A new study by Brown University epidemiologists found that children on the threshold of obesity or overweight in the first two years of life had lower perceptual reasoning and working memory scores than lean children when tested at ages five and eight. The study also indicated that IQ scores may be lower for higher-weight children.

“Excess early-life adiposity was associated with lower IQ, perceptual reasoning and working memory scores at school-age,” Li said.

The authors pointed out that the sample size of their study was limited and that further studies should be conducted to confirm their findings. Future work could also investigate the impact of early-life weight status on school performance, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnoses and special education use.

If these study results hold up in future studies then I’ll know just what the hell happened to me.