How to Feel Old While Attending an Elite University’s Summer Writing Workshop

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

jenny.klionBy Jenny Klion

Acknowledge that you are, in fact, the oldest living being in your class, older probably than the classroom itself, and definitely older than your eye-candy teacher.

If and when you are not the object of any classmate’s romantic or sexual affection: let it go. You had your turn, and you did it well. Remember that at one time, you too might have wondered who that random older woman was—the one looking to get laid at the summer writing workshop.

Realize you may miss out on some late night social intrigue, since you have opted out of staying in the dorms due to the nightmare scenario of shared coed bathrooms. Harken back to the time when you knew you were done doing circus work, because you ultimately couldn’t live without porcelain.

Know that your work may scream Boomer themes and concerns—your poor little rich girl saga, for example—and…

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Increased Mortality Risk Associated With Red Meat Consumption

Eating More Red Meat Lately? You May Want to Reconsider That

Adults who up their red meat intake may face increased mortality risk, suggests an analysis in The BMJ.

The analysis included over 80,000 U.S. health professionals (about two-thirds women) who completed numerous food-frequency questionnaires over two decades. Researchers examined whether changes in red meat consumption over 8 years were associated with mortality risk in the subsequent 8 years. People with histories of cardiovascular disease or cancer were excluded.

During follow-up, some 14,000 participants died. After multivariable adjustment, those who increased their red meat consumption by more than 0.5 servings a day saw a significant 10% increase in mortality risk — regardless of their baseline intake.

Decreases in red meat consumption were associated with decreased mortality risk — but only when they were accompanied by increases in other proteins or plant-based foods like fish, nuts, or whole grains.

BMJ article link below.

Association of changes in red meat consumption with total and cause specific mortality among US women and men: two prospective cohort studies

Soy Protein Decreases Circulating LDL and Total Cholesterol Concentrations in Adults

Conclusions

Soy protein significantly reduced LDL cholesterol by approximately 3–4% in adults. Our data support the advice given to the general public internationally to increase plant protein intake. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03468127.

A Meta-Analysis of 46 Studies Identified by the FDA Demonstrates that Soy Protein Decreases Circulating LDL and Total Cholesterol Concentrations in Adults