Eat Nuts

Eating nuts linked with lower risk of fatal heart attack and stroke

Eating nuts two or more times per week was associated with a 17% lower risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to consuming nuts once every two weeks. The connection was robust even after adjusting for factors that could influence the relationship such as age, sex, education, smoking, and physical activity. Nut intake was inversely associated with the other outcomes but lost significance after adjustment.

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Quote for Today 09.15.19

 

“What possessed me to play the guitar like I do is the music itself. You can’t make music good. You can’t try to be good. You can try to be present and you can try to remain open so what’s going to speak to you can speak through you.”

Michael Hedges

How the carnivore diet works. — Nutritional revolution

Reading Time: 5 minutes So apparently Paul Saladinos and Mikhaila Peterson have recently been talking about me on a podcast. I haven’t had a chance to listen to the podcast, and I probably won’t. But apparently it had something to do with my statements that the benefits of the carnivore diet are caused by calorie restriction. So I will…

via How the carnivore diet works. — Nutritional revolution

Some clear thinking on this topic and should be shared with anyone who has a firm unshakeable opinion in the superiority of their personal beliefs on the ideal human diet.

Thank you Kevin.

Plant Protein Linked to Longer Life

Plant Protein Linked to Longer Life

Link above is to NEJM Journal Watch article.

Conclusions and Relevance  In this large prospective study, higher plant protein intake was associated with lower total and CVD-related mortality. Although animal protein intake was not associated with mortality outcomes, replacement of red meat protein or processed meat protein with plant protein was associated with lower total, cancer-related, and CVD-related mortality.

JAMA Internal Medicine article (Free abstract)

Note: Study focused on Japanese adults.

Low-Fat Dietary Pattern among Postmenopausal Women Influences Long-Term Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Diabetes Outcomes

Conclusions

Reduction in dietary fat with corresponding increase in vegetables, fruit, and grains led to benefits related to breast cancer, CHD, and diabetes, without adverse effects, among healthy postmenopausal US women.

Source: Low-Fat Dietary Pattern among Postmenopausal Women Influences Long-Term Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Diabetes Outcomes

Death by Parkinson Disease

Parkinsons mm6835a6-F

From 1999 to 2017, age-adjusted death rates for Parkinson disease among adults aged ≥65 years increased from 41.7 to 65.3 per 100,000 population. Among men, the age-adjusted death rate increased from 65.2 per 100,000 in 1999 to 97.9 in 2017. Among women, the rate increased from 28.4 per 100,000 in 1999 to 43.0 in 2017. Throughout 1999–2017, the death rates for Parkinson disease for men were higher than those for women.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data 1999–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/vitalstatsonline.htm.

QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Parkinson Disease Among Adults Aged ≥65 Years — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 1999–2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2019;68:773. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6835a6external icon.