Top 5 Retirement Havens

  1. Cambodia
  2. Vietnam
  3. Peru
  4. Nicaragua
  5. Bolivia

Read the source article here.

Wow.

Use Spare Older Workers to Overcome ‘Labour Shortages’ – naked capitalism

Rather than relying on mass immigration to fill phantom ‘labour shortages’ – in turn displacing both young and older workers alike – the more sensible policy option is to moderate immigration and instead better utilise the existing workforce as well as use automation to overcome any loss of workers as the population ages – as has been utilised in Japan.

Source: Use Spare Older Workers to Overcome ‘Labour Shortages’ | naked capitalism

The referenced article describes the situation in Australia but is a worthwhile read for those of us in the US.

“Spare older workers”.  I like that.

What Is CamperForce? – WIRED

Chuck and Barb found that they had a lot in common with their fellow workers, who came from all corners of the United States. Many had seen their retirement savings vanish in the stock market or had lost homes to foreclosure. Others had watched businesses go under or grappled with unemployment and ageism. A larger number had become full-time RVers or vandwellers because they could no longer afford traditional housing—what they called “sticks and bricks.” They talked about how Social Security wasn’t enough to cover the basic necessities and about the yoke of debt from every imaginable source: medical bills, maxed-out credit cards, even student loans.

Source: What Is CamperForce? Amazon’s Nomadic Retiree Army | WIRED

I was delighted and surprised when I found Nomadland by Jessica Bruder available for loan at my local library.  So I downloaded the book and have been reading stories of the forgotten victims of the 2008 financial crisis.  I feel lucky and blessed to be where I am at the present time.  Life for me could have turned out a lot like the people profiled in this book.

Delaying Retirement Could Benefit Your Health

Staying engaged in life

All of this squares with the experience of Claudia Landau, M.D., Ph.D., chief of geriatrics and palliative care at Highland Hospital in Oakland, Calif, and an associate clinical professor at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health.

Early in her career she remembers working with a group of World War I veterans, all over the age of 90. Asked to account for their longevity and relatively good health, they cited a common reason: a desire to learn and stay engaged with life. One of them had just started to study Japanese.

“When people feel more engaged and involved, they have more motivation to do other things that will keep them well,” Landau says. Those can include physical exercise, paying attention to their diet, and simply getting out of the house more.

You may already have a sense of purpose in life, but if not, retirement, and the flexibility it provides, offers a wealth of possibilities. And it might pay to pick several of them. In Landau’s experience, “people who develop multiple ways of engaging with the world do the best,” she says.

Source: Delaying Retirement Could Benefit Your Health

18% of the Workforce Could Retire Within 5 Years

I hesitated before posting this link.  The headline grabs your attention, no?  It got my attention for sure.  Maybe, just maybe there’s hope for our economy and jobs crisis from the demographics.  Then I read the following sentence:

For the purpose of the study, ADP assumed that the average retirement age was 61. Researchers concluded that in many industries, individuals will retire at 61 despite theories suggesting otherwise.

Not gonna happen.  Period.

via 18% of the workforce could retire within five years | LifeHealthPro.