READ THIS BOOK

Now that I have your attention…

“Some of the best evidence for the role of exercise in maintaining weight loss comes from the National Weight Control Registry, an online group of over ten thousand men and women who have lost at least thirty pounds and kept it off for at least a year. These folks defy the cynical view that meaningful, sustainable weight loss is impossible. The average Registry member has lost over sixty pounds and kept it off for more than four years. They are truly exceptional…Nearly all of them (98 percent) report changing their diet to lose weight, which makes sense given how diet can affect the reward and satiety systems in our brain and impact how much we eat.”

Pontzer, Herman. Burn (pp. 255-256). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

It took a while for me to find the manila folder hanging somewhere in one of my file drawers. Surprising because I have a lot less paper files gathering dust in hanging folders. I know it’s here but where? Ah, there it is… Desk 2 south of the tax files, north of my paper life insurance policies. I am participant number 8784.

The National Weight Control Registry (NWCR) was established in 1994 by Rena Wing, Ph.D. from Brown Medical School and James O. Hill, Ph.D. from the University of Colorado. This study is the largest investigation of long-term successful weight loss maintenance. Few individuals succeed at long-term weight loss. The NWCR was developed to identify and investigate the characteristics of individuals who have succeeded at long-term weight loss. The NWCR is tracking over 10,000 individuals who have lost significant amounts of weight and kept it off for long periods of time. http://www.nwcr.ws/

I started sending data to this study in 2007. Most years I get one annual survey. Occasionally I’ve received and completed a number of smaller supplemental surveys. I am 8784 and have kept the weight off for nearly 50 years. Since the Great Melt of 1975 I’ve cycled between 163 and 205 pounds. For the past decade I carried 200-205 pounds on my 5.10 frame. During the first year of the pandemic I dropped 25 pounds (again). Currently I’m holding around 170.

I am exceptional but you can be exceptional too. 8784 signing out.

Thinking About Retirement (or just another fine Saturday Morning)

Andel’s suggestion to anyone contemplating retirement: “Find a new routine that’s meaningful.” He points to people living in the Blue Zones, regions of the world that have been identified to be home to a greater number of residents who’ve reached the age of 100 and beyond. One of the common characteristics among Blue Zone inhabitants is, says Andel, “these people all have purpose.”

Think Retirement Is Smooth Sailing? A Look at Its Potential Effects on the Brain — https://getpocket.com/read/2840794990

The funny thing about life at “retirement age” and still working is you think about retirement a lot.

Since I still work a full time job I have a lot of trouble envisioning what my retirement will look like.

After reading this article and listening to Andel’s short talk I am now scared of retirement.

I need to figure out how to avoid brain rot. But my journal tells me I already have.

My Purpose is to educate others on diet and disease, weight loss and weight management by sharing my personal journey through writing and other teaching activities.

The Covert Life of Hospital Architecture — spaceandorganisation — FREE BOOK

In this post, Julie Zook and I sit down to discuss some key headlines of our recent co-edited book, The Covert Life of Hospital Architecture, which was published open access with UCL Press on 22 March 22. Health as social, hospitals as social We conceived The Covert Life of Hospital Architecture in late 2019, just […]

The Covert Life of Hospital Architecture — spaceandorganisation

The original post has a link to download the full book free of charge.

Before you think this is an odd post from an old underwriter I’ll give a brief explanation. My major in college was Sociology, one of my kids is an Architect, and the other is in medicine.

But the original post had me at FREE BOOK.

The App That Helps Me Be a More Patient Centered Physician — A Country Doctor Writes:

One of the most rewarding things I do in my clinic happens on my iPhone. When I sit down with a middle aged patient to talk about their cardiovascular risk, I open the risk calculator created by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. I talk my way through as I enter […]

The App That Helps Me Be a More Patient Centered Physician — A Country Doctor Writes:

The risk calculator is quite useful but I re-blogged this post for its link to the Hale study, which was news to me. This study published in 2004 showed older people between the ages of 70 and 90 who followed a Mediterranean diet have 50% lower rate of all-cause and cause-specific mortality than people who dine on the SAD Western diet. The four primary risk factors were diet, moderate alcohol intake, physical activity, and non-smoking.

Lifestyle matters.

Internet Use in Retirement and Cognitive Function

Focusing on a sample of 2,105 older people from Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Israel, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland who have been retired since 2004, researchers examined retirees’ cognitive function in both 2013 and 2015. They specifically focused on a word recall test, where individuals were asked to recall a list of 10 words immediately, and then again five minutes later.

Results found that, on average, people who used the internet after they retired were able to recall 1.22 extra words in the recall test compared to non-internet users. However, retirees who used the internet were also more likely to be male, younger, better educated, and have been retired for a shorter period. They also appear to be in better health — even though they drink and smoke more.

Lancaster University. “Using internet in retirement boosts cognitive function.” ScienceDaily. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/09/210920100910.htm (accessed September 20, 2021).

The Myth of Retirement

Prices in the three production stages that are the furthest up the pipeline (Stages 1-3, red, green, gray) have all jumped by over 20% year-over-year. Prices at production stage 4 (black), up 12.1% year-over-year, are inputs for final demand prices, which are inputs for consumer prices.

Final demand prices are what consumer prices will encounter pretty soon in their consumer prices. Stage 4 intermediate demand prices will follow. And prices in productions stages 1-3 are further behind, but they’re true whoppers, and they will provide massive pressures on consumer prices for months to come:

Up the Price Pipeline, Inflation Rages at 20% — https://wolfstreet.com/2021/09/10/up-the-price-pipeline-inflation-rages-at-20/#comments

Prior to the 1950’s, there was no such thing as retirement, as the term is used today. A 1950 poll showed that most workers aspired to work for as long as possible. Quitting was for the disabled. Also, remember that in 1935 when the government was determining the appropriate retirement age for social security (65) the average adult male died at age 63.

The Baby Boom generation is also living longer than the generation before it. Chances are a married couple age 65 will have one spouse live into his or her early nineties. That is nearly 30 years of living off of one’s savings and Social Security if one retires at age 65. The math does not work for this many people. For so many to have golden years, there needs to be gold (money) to support them.

Trust Company Oklahoma May 2016 The Retirement Myth — https://www.trustok.com/our-latest-quarterly-newsletter/

Thinking about retirement? I’ve been thinking about retirement for quite some time and the thought of not working doesn’t appeal to me. There will come a time when the 40+ hour workweek will be no longer doable. But for now that time is far off in the future. The math in retirement will not work for the majority. I see inflation all around and my planned retirement income streams and savings will not last as long as hoped if everything costs more. Retirement math now is simple. If you can, work longer and save more.

Thursday 08.12.21 – More Diabetes Research for Your Reading Pleasure

Prevalence and incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications over 15 years among patients with incident type 2 diabetes

Our findings show that a substantial proportion of patients had existing complications including CKD, stable angina, and peripheral neuropathy at the time of T2D diagnosis. Results also show that among those newly diagnosed with T2D, the highest incidence rates of complications included peripheral neuropathy, CKD, and CVD (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and stroke).

Time to incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications was only a few years; peripheral vascular disease, stable angina, CKD, and peripheral neuropathy developed earlier in the disease course.

BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care – http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001847

Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Mortality in People With Type 1 Diabetes and Eating Disorders

CONCLUSIONS Adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes and eating disorders have more than triple the risk of DKA and nearly sixfold increased risk of death compared with their peers without eating disorders.

Diabetes Care 2021 Aug; 44(8): 1783-1787. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc21-0517

Fenofibrate Use Is Associated With Lower Mortality and Fewer Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Diabetes: Results of 10,114 Patients From the Korean National Health Insurance Service Cohort

Diabetes Care 2021 Aug; 44(8): 1868-1876. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-1533

I’ve been out of town the past three weekends in a row. Prior to taking these trips I was feeling a bit burned out. I had little desire to continue my research activities. I had even less desire to write or post to my blogs. But as suddenly as my energy levels dipped, the mojo came back.

Hiatus is over. The SupremeCmdr is back.