Meanwhile in…Oklahoma jumps to 4th in U.S. for COVID-19 positivity, 9th in new cases

Oklahoma has an 11.3% positivity rate — the percentage of COVID-19 tests that are positive — more than double the country’s positivity rate of 5.2%. The state’s rate is its highest yet, surpassing the 10.1% in the July 26 report to become the second time Oklahoma has landed in the positivity red zone.

Oklahoma’s new case rate is 146 per 100,000 people, nearly two-thirds more than the national average of 88 per 100,000. The state has been in the red zone for new cases for nine consecutive weeks.

A week ago the report warned that virus transmission was increasing in the “major university towns.”

Oklahoma jumps to 4th in U.S. for COVID-19 positivity, 9th in new cases — https://tulsaworld.com/news/state-and-regional/oklahoma-jumps-to-4th-in-u-s-for-covid-19-positivity-9th-in-new-cases/article_e111c7ae-f2ad-11ea-9ed9-2fe10f044c6b.html#tracking-source=home-trending

Living Large

Do the People Who Live in This House Have the Right to Be “Struggling”?

It is a nice house, but not an extravagant one. It sits next to a house in disrepair, and another house that is kept up. If you notice, there are two doors. The address 196 Lefferts Place, Brooklyn, New York, is divided into two homes, and the house I am talking about is Unit B, consisting of the upper floors of the structure. The cost to be the proud owner of 196 Lefferts Place, Unit B, is $1.395 million.

The greater fool theory in the US residential real estate market.

Have I mentioned lately why I live in Oklahoma?