Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) – a Primer

The incidence of TIA in the United States is estimated to be 200,000-500,000 per year, with a prevalence of 5 million individuals, but is likely underreported.2 Stroke is preceded by TIA in 12-30% of patients and is the 5th leading cause of death in the US, contributing significantly to long term disability.2,3 Strokes occur more commonly in men than women, but women experience more severe morbidity.2,3 Stroke prevalence increases with age and occurs more frequently in black and Hispanic populations.3 It should also be noted that 90% of strokes worldwide occur in the setting of potentially modifiable risk factors which presents an incredible opportunity for early intervention, especially following TIA.2

TIA: Emergency Department Evaluation and Disposition — http://www.emdocs.net/tia-emergency-department-evaluation-and-disposition/?utm_source=feedly&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tia-emergency-department-evaluation-and-disposition

MIND Your Diet

MIND diet is associated with better cognitive functioning independently of brain pathology, suggesting that the MIND diet may contribute to cognitive resilience in older adults.

Dhana, Klodian et al. ‘MIND Diet, Common Brain Pathologies, and Cognition in Community-Dwelling Older Adults’. 1 Jan. 2021 : 683 – 692. — https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/jad210107

So, what is the MIND diet?

The traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern includes mainly whole, minimally processed plant foods including cereal grains, legumes, vegetables, fruit, nuts, and fish with small amounts of meat, milk, and dairy products and a regular modest amount of alcohol.4 The DASH diet emphasizes fruit, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and includes whole grains, poultry, fish, and nuts, and is reduced in fats, red meat, sweets, and sugar-containing beverages.4 Combining the two diets, the MIND diet emphasizes natural, plant-based foods, specifically promoting an increase in the consumption of berries and green leafy vegetables, with limited intakes of animal-based and high saturated fat foods.

What Are the Components to the MIND Diet? — https://jandonline.org/article/S2212-2672(15)01251-4/fulltext

I became aware of the MIND diet earlier this year. It’s nice to know my dietary pattern has a name.

Untreated Sleep Apnea Boosts Risk of Heart Disease, Stroke | Medpage Today

Untreated Sleep Apnea Boosts Risk of Heart Disease, Stroke | Medpage Today.

Compared with OSA-negative patients, untreated OSA was associated with an 86% higher mortality risk (adjusted hazard ratio 1.86, 95% CI 1.81 to 1.91), and treated OSA was associated with a 35% higher mortality risk (aHR 1.35, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.51), wrote Miklos Z. Molnar, MD, PhD, of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, and colleagues, in the journal Thorax.

Untreated OSA also was associated with a 3.5 times higher risk of incident coronary heart disease (aHR 3.54, 95% CI 3.40 to 3.69), and a 3.5 times higher risk of incident strokes (aHR 3.48, 95% CI 3.28 to 3.64), while treated OSA was associated with a threefold higher risk of incident CHD (aHR 3.06, 95% CI 2.62 to 3.56) and 3.5-fold higher risk of incident strokes (aHR 3.50, 95% CI 2.92 to 4.19). The risk of incident kidney disease also was significantly higher in untreated (aHR 2.27, 95% CI 2.19 to 2.36) and treated OSA (aHR 2.79, 95% CI 2.48 to 3.13).

Daily Aspirin – Yes or No?

Aspirin: FDA Says ‘No’ Others Say ‘Yes’.

I found this article quite helpful in my own decision regarding whether or not to continue my daily aspirin 81 mg dose.

The bump I gave myself on the shin a few weeks ago that bled profusely and took hours to clot was also quite helpful in my decision regarding whether or not to continue my daily aspirin 81 mg dose. 

Update 06.06.14

Check out the following link.  If you’re an older male you might find this of interest.

http://www.webmd.com/erectile-dysfunction/news/20110303/regular-use-of-painkillers-linked-to-ed

Update 07.26.14

This link takes you to the 2012 Circulation article.

Aspirin.

Update 08.04.14

More links for your reading and research pleasure.

Aspirin May Not Protect Against Cardiovascular Disease – Prevention.com.

Benefits of aspirin more modest than previously believed — St George’s, University of London.

Researchers from Professor Kausik Ray’s group at St George’s, University of London investigated the drug’s effectiveness in primary prevention and the prevalence of side effects. They also assessed if aspirin had any impact on the risk of death from cancer among people considered at risk of cardiovascular disease.

They analysed data from nine clinical trials involving over 100,000 participants without a history of cardiovascular disease. Half of the participants took aspirin and half took a placebo. The average participant in the aspirin arm of these trials took aspirin for about six years.

The researchers found that although aspirin in conventional daily or alternate day doses reduced the risk of total cardiovascular disease events by 10 per cent, this was largely due to a reduction in non-fatal heart attacks. It did not include a reduction in other cardiovascular disease events including death from heart attack, or fatal or non-fatal stroke.

The study also showed that this benefit was almost entirely offset by a 30 per cent increase in risk of life-threatening or debilitating internal bleeding events. This means that while one cardiovascular disease event was averted for every 120 people treated with aspirin for about six years, one in 73 people suffered from potentially significant bleeding during the same period.