What does cable news do to your brain?

What does cable news do to your brain? A neurosurgeon explains.

The availability of up to the minute information, presented 24/7/365, could assist a democratic society in making the best choices in determining its future. That was the promise of cable news. Unfortunately, cable news has fallen short of its potential and has led to the further polarization of America. More than that, it has changed the way your brain works.

Does cable news change how your brain works?

Possibly.  But I take no chances.  I don’t watch cable news networks.

Daddy always told me you go to college so that they can teach you how to think.

Unfortunately nowadays institutions of higher “education” teach the young what to think, not how to think.

Think about this for a while.

If you can.

 

Living Tiny

Why I hate living in my tiny house

At the end of a long driveway, inside a former garage, it’s 240 square feet, or roughly the size of one and a half parking spaces…The small size saves energy and curbs my shopping habits, since there literally isn’t any room for, say, another pair of shoes.

Vaporizing and inhaling an oily liquid is bad? Go figure…

Vaporizing and inhaling an oily liquid is bad? Go figure…

American Thoracic Society

PUBLIC HEALTH | INFORMATION SERIES

http://www.thoracic.org

Diseases Associated with VAPI

The following patterns of lung injury have been reported with VAPI:

■■Acute eosinophilic pneumonia

■■Lipoid pneumonia

■■Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

■■Acute and subacute hypersensitivity pneumonitis

■■Organizing pneumonia

■■Acute eosinophilic pneumonia

■■Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage

■■Respiratory bronchiolitis-associated pneumonitis

Nearly 300 New Cases of Vaping-Related Lung Disease This Week

Teen e-cigarette use doubles since 2017

Plant Protein Linked to Longer Life

Plant Protein Linked to Longer Life

Link above is to NEJM Journal Watch article.

Conclusions and Relevance  In this large prospective study, higher plant protein intake was associated with lower total and CVD-related mortality. Although animal protein intake was not associated with mortality outcomes, replacement of red meat protein or processed meat protein with plant protein was associated with lower total, cancer-related, and CVD-related mortality.

JAMA Internal Medicine article (Free abstract)

Note: Study focused on Japanese adults.

Plant‐Based Diets Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Disease Mortality, and All‐Cause Mortality in a General Population of Middle‐Aged Adults

Plant‐Based Diets Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Disease Mortality, and All‐Cause Mortality in a General Population of Middle‐Aged Adults

In this community‐based cohort of US adults without cardiovascular disease at baseline, we found that higher adherence to an overall plant‐based diet or a pro-vegetarian diet, diets that are higher in plant foods and lower in animal foods, was associated with a lower risk of incident cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all‐cause mortality. Healthy plant‐based diets, which are higher in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, tea, and coffee and lower in animal foods, were associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and all‐cause mortality.

Our study is one of the few studies that used data from a general population. Prospective studies of Seventh‐Day Adventists in the United States and Canada found that vegetarians had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and all‐cause mortality compared with nonvegetarians.4 The EPIC (European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition)‐Oxford study of vegetarians, vegans, and health‐conscious individuals reported that the risk of incident ischemic heart disease and deaths caused by circulatory disease was lower in vegetarians than nonvegetarians.5, 24 However, these findings were not replicated in population‐based studies in Australia and the United States.6, 13 Notably, a prior study that used data from a nationally representative sample administered a brief questionnaire that assessed the frequency with which participants consumed specific types of animal food (red meat, processed meat, poultry, or fish or seafood) to characterize participants’ dietary intakes.6 Such dietary measurement may not have adequately represented dietary patterns on the basis of abundance of plant foods relative to animal foods. The plant‐based diet indexes we used in this study captured a wider spectrum of intake of plant foods and animal foods, leveraging the available dietary data, and allowed us to move away from defining plant‐based diets strictly based on exclusion of animal foods.

 

Plant-based sales surge to $4.5 billion

New data released by The Good Food Institute (G.F.I.) and the Plant-Based Foods Association (P.B.F.A.) show plant-based foods sales significantly outpaced overall grocery sales last year. U.S. retail sales of plant-based foods grew 11% — five times more than total food sales — bringing the total plant-based market to $4.5 billion.

Read the entire Food Business News article here.