Change in Diet Can Lower Mortality Risk

A worsening diet over the course of 12 years was associated with an increased mortality of 6% to 12%, the researchers found.  Those who stayed consistently on a healthy diet starting at baseline had a 9% to 14% lower risk for death than those who stayed consistently on a poor diet.

Source: Change in Diet Can Lower Mortality Risk

Source: Association of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality — NEJM

 

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Fried potato consumption is associated with elevated mortality: an 8-y longitudinal cohort study

Source: Fried potato consumption is associated with elevated mortality: an 8-y longitudinal cohort study

Results: Of the 4400 participants, 2551 (57.9%) were women with a mean ± SD age of 61.3 ± 9.2 y. During the 8-y follow-up, 236 participants died. After adjustment for 14 potential baseline confounders, and taking those with the lowest consumption of potatoes as the reference group, participants with the highest consumption of potatoes did not show an increased risk of overall mortality (HR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.91). However, subgroup analyses indicated that participants who consumed fried potatoes 2–3 times/wk (HR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.11, 3.41) and ≥3 times/wk (HR: 2.26; 95% CI: 1.15, 4.47) were at an increased risk of mortality. The consumption of unfried potatoes was not associated with an increased mortality risk.

Conclusions: The frequent consumption of fried potatoes appears to be associated with an increased mortality risk.

The abstract indicates the researchers controlled for “14 confounders”.  Note the increased mortality impact was from a subgroup analysis.  Since I’m unwilling to pay $40 USD for the full study I’ll never know if the researchers controlled for triple cheeseburgers, eggs, bacon, sausage, fried fish,  or any other foods commonly consumed with fried potatoes.

Poutine???

Sushi Worm Parasite – NutritionFacts.org

How do the worms get into our brain, causing so-called neurognathostomiasis? Gnathostoma worms are highly invasive parasites. After you leave the sushi bar, the larvae can penetrate the wall of your intestine. They can then enter the brain through the base of the skull, crawling along the spinal nerves and vessels. They start out in the nerve roots, enter the spinal cord, and then can climb up into the brain. The worm isn’t poisonous or anything; it’s just the migration of the worm through the body that causes direct mechanical injury because of tearing of nerve tissues.

Source: Sushi Worm Parasite | NutritionFacts.org

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again.

Sushi would be fine if you cooked it.

White Meats Carry Lower Mortality Risks than Reds, But We Eat Too Much of Both — Physician’s First Watch

Source: White Meats Carry Lower Mortality Risks than Reds, But We Eat Too Much of Both — Physician’s First Watch

Source: Mortality from different causes associated with meat, heme iron, nitrates, and nitrites in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study: population based cohort study | The BMJ

I’m feeling guilty about the three cheddar cheeseburger sliders I had last night.

Guess I’ll have another beer.