Secondary-Prevention Data Strong for Fish Oil Caps: AHA Advisory

Source: Secondary-Prevention Data Strong for Fish Oil Caps: AHA Advisory

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CardioBrief: Studies Spotlight Triglycerides, Put HDL in the Shade | Medpage Today

Two new studies provide more evidence tilting the balance in favor of triglycerides, rather than HDL, playing a causative role in cardiovascular disease. But it is still too early to know whether the findings of any of the studies will point to useful new methods to prevent and treat disease.

Source: CardioBrief: Studies Spotlight Triglycerides, Put HDL in the Shade | Medpage Today

There are links to other studies at the end of this Medpage article.

Take Home – Do not ignore triglycerides.

Stroke Rounds: Long Work Hours, Stroke and CHD Risk Associated | Medpage Today

via Stroke Rounds: Long Work Hours, Stroke and CHD Risk Associated | Medpage Today.

“Working 55 hours or more a week was associated with significant 33% increase in stroke risk and a more modest 13% increase in risk of developing coronary heart disease, compared to working 35 to 40 hours weekly, in the analysis of published and previously unpublished prospective cohort studies from the U.S., Europe, and Australia.”

One could argue for causation given the strength of association identified by this study.  Common sense tells us that anyone working more than 60 hours a week is going to have considerably less time for other activities like exercise and time with family and friends.  Long hours working also can lead to neglect of one’s health.

FDA Stiffens Warning on NSAID Cardiovascular Risk | Medpage Today

FDA Stiffens Warning on NSAID Cardiovascular Risk | Medpage Today.

Thought I would add a link to the actual FDA alert.

via Safety Alerts for Human Medical Products > Non-aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs): Drug Safety Communication – FDA Strengthens Warning of Increased Chance of Heart Attack or Stroke.

NSAIDs can increase the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with or without heart disease or risk factors for heart disease. A large number of studies support this finding, with varying estimates of how much the risk is increased, depending on the drugs and the doses studied.