My Hemoglobin A1C is (fill in the blank)

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2783419

Citation

Jonas DE, Crotty K, Yun JDY, et al. Screening for Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes: Updated Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force. JAMA. 2021;326(8):744–760. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.10403

Thursday 08.12.21 – More Diabetes Research for Your Reading Pleasure

Prevalence and incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications over 15 years among patients with incident type 2 diabetes

Our findings show that a substantial proportion of patients had existing complications including CKD, stable angina, and peripheral neuropathy at the time of T2D diagnosis. Results also show that among those newly diagnosed with T2D, the highest incidence rates of complications included peripheral neuropathy, CKD, and CVD (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and stroke).

Time to incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications was only a few years; peripheral vascular disease, stable angina, CKD, and peripheral neuropathy developed earlier in the disease course.

BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care – http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001847

Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Mortality in People With Type 1 Diabetes and Eating Disorders

CONCLUSIONS Adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes and eating disorders have more than triple the risk of DKA and nearly sixfold increased risk of death compared with their peers without eating disorders.

Diabetes Care 2021 Aug; 44(8): 1783-1787. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc21-0517

Fenofibrate Use Is Associated With Lower Mortality and Fewer Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Diabetes: Results of 10,114 Patients From the Korean National Health Insurance Service Cohort

Diabetes Care 2021 Aug; 44(8): 1868-1876. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-1533

I’ve been out of town the past three weekends in a row. Prior to taking these trips I was feeling a bit burned out. I had little desire to continue my research activities. I had even less desire to write or post to my blogs. But as suddenly as my energy levels dipped, the mojo came back.

Hiatus is over. The SupremeCmdr is back.

Just Another Sweet Sunday

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We linked data from two Danish type 2 diabetes cohorts, the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People With Screen-Detected Diabetes in Primary Care (ADDITION-Denmark) and the Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2), to national health care registers. The Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument questionnaire (MNSIq) was completed at diabetes diagnosis in ADDITION-Denmark and at a median of 4.6 years after diagnosis of diabetes in DD2. An MNSIq score ≥4 was considered as indicative of DPN. Using Poisson regressions, we computed incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of CVD and all-cause mortality comparing MNSIq scores ≥4 with scores <4. Analyses were adjusted for a range of established CVD risk factors.

RESULTS In total, 1,445 (ADDITION-Denmark) and 5,028 (DD2) individuals were included in the study. Compared with MNSIq scores <4, MNSIq scores ≥4 were associated with higher incidence rate of CVD, with IRRs of 1.79 (95% CI 1.38–2.31) in ADDITION-Denmark, 1.57 (CI 1.27–1.94) in the DD2, and a combined IRR of 1.65 (CI 1.41–1.95) in a fixed-effect meta-analysis. MNSIq scores ≥4 did not associate with mortality; combined mortality rate ratio was 1.11 (CI 0.83–1.48).

CONCLUSIONS The MNSIq may be a tool to identify a subgroup within individuals with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes with a high incidence rate of subsequent CVD. MNSIq scores ≥4, indicating DPN, were associated with a markedly higher incidence rate of CVD, beyond that conferred by established CVD risk factors.

Diabetic Polyneuropathy Early in Type 2 Diabetes Is Associated With Higher Incidence Rate of Cardiovascular Disease: Results From Two Danish Cohort Studies — Diabetes Care 2021 Jul; 44(7): 1714-1721. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc21-0010

The results for the 500 young adult participants in the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth 2 (TODAY 2) study were published online July 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine by the TODAY study group.At follow-up — after originally participating in the TODAY trial when they were young teenagers — they had a mean age of 26.4 years.

At this time, more than two thirds had hypertension and half had dyslipidemia.

Overall, 60% had at least one diabetic microvascular complication (retinal disease, neuropathy, or diabetic kidney disease), and more than a quarter had two or more such complications.

‘Shocking’ Early Complications From Teen-Onset Type 2 Diabetes – Medscape – Jul 28, 2021. – https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/955590?src=rss#vp_1

Type 2 Diabetes Risk and…Sardines?

Older people with prediabetes who followed a diet rich in sardines for 1 year show significant reductions in risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with those placed on a similarly healthy diet but without the sardines, results from a new randomized trial show.

 “A 1-year, sardine-enriched type 2 diabetes-preventive diet in an elderly population with prediabetes exerts a greater protective effect against developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events, by improving anthropometric parameters, blood chemistry profile, lipid composition in erythrocytes membranes, and metabolomics data,” report the authors in research published in Clinical Nutrition by Diana Díaz-Rizzolo, PhD, of the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Spain, and colleagues.

Sardines Linked to Reduced Type 2 Diabetes Risk — https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/951528?src=rss#vp_1

Very small study with very interesting findings.

If I only liked sardines.

CVD Remains Leading Cause of Death in Type 2 Diabetes – Medscape

Cardiovascular disease was the leading cause of death among the over 16,000 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) who were enrolled in the SAVOR-TIMI 53 trial.

Two-thirds (66.3%) of all 798 deaths after a median 2.1 years of follow-up were caused by one of five cardiovascular (CV) conditions, with sudden cardiac death accounting for the largest share (30.1%) of the total, Ilaria Cavallari, MD, PhD, and associates said in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

It was a pair of laboratory measurements, however, that had the largest subdistribution hazard ratios. “Interestingly, the magnitude of associations of abnormal N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide [sHR, 2.82] and high-sensitivity troponin T [sHR, 2.46] measured in a stable population were greater than clinical variables in the prediction of all causes of death,” Cavallari and associates said.

CVD Remains Leading Cause of Death in Type 2 Diabetes – Medscape – Apr 06, 2021 — https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/948849?src=rss

Diabetes and Covid-19

Catching up on diabetes and found several interesting studies.

CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes status, both type 1 and type 2, independently increases the adverse impacts of COVID-19. Potentially modifiable factors (e.g., HbA1c) had significant but modest impact compared with comparatively static factors (e.g., race and insurance) in type 1 diabetes, indicating an urgent and continued need to mitigate severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection risk in this community.

COVID-19 Severity Is Tripled in the Diabetes Community: A Prospective Analysis of the Pandemic’s Impact in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes — http://Diabetes Care 2021 Feb; 44(2): 526-532. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-2260

CONCLUSIONS: Social vulnerability contributes considerably to the probability of hospitalization among individuals with COVID-19 and diabetes with associated comorbidities. These findings can inform mitigation strategies for populations at the highest risk of severe COVID-19.

Incremental Risk of Developing Severe COVID-19 Among Mexican Patients With Diabetes Attributed to Social and Health Care Access Disadvantages — http://Diabetes Care 2021 Feb; 44(2): 373-380. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-2192

This study shows that diabetes is associated with a greater risk of fatal COVID-19, influenza/pneumonia, and CHD in both sexes. However, unlike for CHD, there are no sex differences in the association between diabetes and death from COVID-19 or influenza/pneumonia. Our finding that diabetes is associated with higher risk of COVID-19 mortality is consistent with other studies (14). A study of 61 million individuals in England showed that over a third of all in-hospital COVID-19–related deaths occurred in those with diabetes, and those with diabetes had higher odds of in-hospital COVID-19–related death than those without diabetes (1). In contrast to our study, however, that study suggested that women with diabetes were at higher risk of COVID-19–related mortality than men (1). Our results suggest that worse glycemic control might further increase risk of COVID-19 mortality among those with diabetes. Some studies have also reported that individuals with undiagnosed diabetes are particularly at increased risk of severe COVID-19 infections (3,4). Although relatively few participants had undiagnosed diabetes in the current study, we showed that undiagnosed diabetes was associated with a 3.5-fold excess risk of COVID-19 mortality in men. Although there were no sex differences in the association between HbA1c levels and COVID-19 mortality, the finding that associations are broadly similar across sexes and diseases with the exception of women with CHD is interesting, and it is important when considering mechanistic explanations of the female disadvantage in CHD. Overall, these findings indicate that strategies to prevent diabetes, to promptly identify individuals with diabetes, and to improve glycemic control among those with diabetes could lead to better COVID-19 outcomes for both sexes.

Diabetes and COVID-19–Related Mortality in Women and Men in the UK Biobank: Comparisons With Influenza/Pneumonia and Coronary Heart Disease — http://Diabetes Care 2021 Feb; 44(2): e22-e24. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-2378

Take home lesson: don’t develop diabetes.

An Early-Onset Subgroup of Type 2 Diabetes: A Multigenerational, Prospective Analysis in the Framingham Heart Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the relation of type 2 diabetes occurring earlier (age <55 years) versus later in life to the risk of cardiovascular death and to diabetes in offspring.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In the Framingham Heart Study, a community-based prospective cohort study, glycemic status was ascertained at serial examinations over six decades among 5,571 first- and second-generation participants with mortality data and 2,123 second-generation participants who initially did not have diabetes with data on parental diabetes status. We assessed cause of death in a case (cardiovascular death)–control (noncardiovascular death) design and incident diabetes in offspring in relation to parental early-onset diabetes.

RESULTS Among the participants in two generations (N = 5,571), there were 1,822 cardiovascular deaths (including 961 coronary deaths). The odds of cardiovascular versus noncardiovascular death increased with decreasing age of diabetes onset (P < 0.001 trend). Compared with never developing diabetes, early-onset diabetes conferred a 1.81-fold odds (95% CI 1.10–2.97, P = 0.02) of cardiovascular death and 1.75-fold odds (0.96–3.21, P = 0.07) of coronary death, whereas later-onset diabetes was not associated with greater risk for either (P = 0.09 for cardiovascular death; P = 0.51 for coronary death). In second-generation participants, having a parent with early-onset diabetes increased diabetes risk by 3.24-fold (1.73–6.07), whereas having one or both parents with late-onset diabetes increased diabetes risk by 2.19-fold (1.50–3.19).

CONCLUSIONS Our findings provide evidence for a diabetes subgroup with an early onset, a stronger association with cardiovascular death, and higher transgenerational transmission.

Diabetes Care 2020 Dec; 43(12): 3086-3093. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc19-1758

Translation – The earlier you develop diabetes your risk of CVD and coronary death is higher. An if one or both of your parents developed either early onset or late onset diabetes you’re screwed.

Cost effectiveness of dietetic intervention in management of type 2 diabetes — Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics Notes

Siopsis et al., JHND Early View Background The management of diabetes costs in excess of $1.3 trillion per annum worldwide. Diet is central to the management of type 2 diabetes. It is not known whether dietetic intervention is cost effective. This scoping review aimed to map the existing literature concerning the cost effectiveness of medical […]

Cost effectiveness of dietetic intervention in management of type 2 diabetes — Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics Notes

Of 2387 abstracts assessed for eligibility, four studies combining 22 765 adults with type 2 diabetes were included. Dietetic intervention was shown to be cost‐effective in terms of diabetes‐related healthcare costs and hospital charges, at the same time as also reducing the risk of cumulative days at work lost to less than half and the risk of disability ‘sick’ days at work to less than one‐seventh.

Conclusions: The findings highlight the importance of advocacy for medical nutrition therapy for people with type 2 diabetes, with respect to alleviating the great global economic burden from this condition. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the factors that mediate and moderate cost effectiveness and to allow for the generalisation of the findings.

First published: 14 October 2020
https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12821

Sex Differences in Coronary Artery Calcium and Mortality From Coronary Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, and All Causes in Adults With Diabetes

Sex Differences in Coronary Artery Calcium and Mortality From Coronary Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, and All Causes in Adults With Diabetes: The Coronary Calcium Consortium

RESULTS Among 4,503 adults with diabetes (32.5% women) aged 21–93 years, 61.2% of women and 80.4% of men had CAC >0. Total, CVD, and CHD mortality rates were directly related to CAC; women had higher total and CVD death rates than men when CAC >100. Age- and risk factor–adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) per log unit CAC were higher among women versus men for total mortality (1.28 vs. 1.18) (interaction P = 0.01) and CVD mortality (1.47 vs. 1.27) (interaction P = 0.04) but were similar for CHD mortality (1.48 and 1.48). For CVD mortality, HRs with CAC scores of 101–400 and >400 were 3.67 and 6.27, respectively, for women and 1.63 and 3.48, respectively, for men (interaction P = 0.04). For total mortality, HRs were 2.56 and 4.05 for women, respectively, and 1.88 and 2.66 for men, respectively (interaction P = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS CAC predicts CHD, CVD, and all-cause mortality in patients with diabetes; however, greater CAC predicts CVD and total mortality more strongly in women.

Sex Differences in Coronary Artery Calcium and Mortality From Coronary Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, and All Causes in Adults With Diabetes: The Coronary Calcium Consortium — Diabetes Care 2020 Oct; 43(10): 2597-2606. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-0166

COVID-19 and Diabetes, Sub-types of DM2, B Vitamins in Diabetes Incidence and more

This article provides an overview of the clinical evidence on the poorer clinical outcomes of COVID-19 infection in patients with diabetes versus patients without diabetes, including in specific patient populations, such as children, pregnant women, and racial and ethnic minorities.

COVID-19 and Diabetes: A Collision and Collusion of Two Diseases — Diabetes 2020 Oct; dbi200032. https://doi.org/10.2337/dbi20-0032

In the article above the researchers reviewed nearly 90 studies.

Novel diabetes subtype characteristics. Overview of distribution and characteristics of subtypes generated by clustering based on clinical parameters in the Swedish ANDIS cohort.

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is defined by a single metabolite, glucose, but is increasingly recognized as a highly heterogeneous disease, including individuals with varying clinical characteristics, disease progression, drug response, and risk of complications. Identification of subtypes with differing risk profiles and disease etiologies at diagnosis could open up avenues for personalized medicine and allow clinical resources to be focused to the patients who would be most likely to develop diabetic complications, thereby both improving patient health and reducing costs for the health sector. More homogeneous populations also offer increased power in experimental, genetic, and clinical studies. Clinical parameters are easily available and reflect relevant disease pathways, including the effects of both genetic and environmental exposures. We used six clinical parameters (GAD autoantibodies, age at diabetes onset, HbA1c, BMI, and measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion) to cluster adult-onset diabetes patients into five subtypes. These subtypes have been robustly reproduced in several populations and associated with different risks of complications, comorbidities, genetics, and response to treatment. Importantly, the group with severe insulin-deficient diabetes (SIDD) had increased risk of retinopathy and neuropathy, whereas the severe insulin-resistant diabetes (SIRD) group had the highest risk for diabetic kidney disease (DKD) and fatty liver, emphasizing the importance of insulin resistance for DKD and hepatosteatosis in T2D. In conclusion, we believe that subclassification using these highly relevant parameters could provide a framework for personalized medicine in diabetes.

Subtypes of Type 2 Diabetes Determined From Clinical Parameters — Diabetes 2020 Oct; 69(10): 2086-2093. https://doi.org/10.2337/dbi20-0001

Not just potential for personalized medicine in the treatment of diabetes but perhaps a framework for better risk stratification and selection in life insurance.

Intakes of Folate, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12 in Relation to Diabetes Incidence Among American Young Adults: A 30-Year Follow-up Study

RESULTS During 30 years (mean 20.5 ± 8.9) of follow-up, 655 incident cases of diabetes occurred. Intake of folate, but not vitamin B6 or vitamin B12, was inversely associated with diabetes incidence after adjustment for potential confounders. Compared with the lowest quintile of total folate intake, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) in quintiles 2–5 were 0.85 (0.67–1.08), 0.78 (0.60–1.02), 0.82 (0.62–1.09), and 0.70 (0.51–0.97; Ptrend = 0.02). Higher folate intake was also associated with lower plasma homocysteine (Ptrend < 0.01) and insulin (Ptrend < 0.01). Among supplement users, folate intake was inversely associated with serum C-reactive protein levels (Ptrend < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS Intake of folate in young adulthood was inversely associated with diabetes incidence in midlife among Americans. The observed association may be partially explained by mechanisms related to homocysteine level, insulin sensitivity, and systemic inflammation.

Intakes of Folate, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12 in Relation to Diabetes Incidence Among American Young Adults: A 30-Year Follow-up Study — Diabetes Care 2020 Oct; 43(10): 2426-2434. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-0828

Folate is a B vitamin that occurs naturally in foods such as green leafy vegetables, citrus fruit, and beans. So eat your greens and beans. Taking a supplement can’t hurt either. My multivitamin has plenty of folate.