Scooter Madness In Austin – Kaiser Health News

AUSTIN, Texas — University of Texas star baseball shortstop David Hamilton hit a pothole riding an electric scooter, tearing his Achilles tendon and requiring surgery. He’ll miss the season. Cristal Glangchai, the CEO for a nonprofit, hit a rock riding her scooter, landing her on the pavement just blocks from home. “I lost control and…

via Scooter Madness In Austin Puts Safety Concerns In High Gear — Kaiser Health News

Death by scooter?  Yes, we have our first fatality.

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The Peter Attia Drive Podcast: Longevity, Lipidology, Fructose, and How To Keep Your Face And Joints Young

Many thanks to Dr. P for reminding me to check and see what Dr. Attia has been up to lately.

The Skeptical Cardiologist

Lately while exercising I’ve been binge-listening to podcasts from Peter Attia, a cancer surgeon turned “longevity” doctor.

I first encountered his writing while researching ketosis, the Atkins diet and low carb diets in 2012 and found his writing to be incredibly well-researched, detailed and helpful.

I appreciate how he never opts for oversimplification of a topic as this disclaimer at the begining of his post on ketosis indicates:

If you want to actually understand this topic, you must invest the time and mental energy to do so.  You really have to get into the details.  Obviously, I love the details and probably read 5 or 6 scientific papers every week on this topic (and others).  I don’t expect the casual reader to want to do this, and I view it as my role to synthesize this information and present it to you. But this is not a bumper-sticker issue.  I…

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Take these 5 things into consideration when you’re trying to find your calling

The researchers found that people who believe that passion comes from pleasurable work were less likely to feel that they had found their passion (and were more likely to want to leave their job) as compared with people who believe that passion comes from doing what you feel matters. Perhaps this is because there is a superficiality and ephemerality to working for sheer pleasure–what fits the bill one month or year might not do so for long–whereas working towards what you care about is a timeless endeavour that is likely to stretch and sustain you indefinitely. The researchers conclude that their results show “the extent to which individuals attain their desired level of work passion may have less to do with their actual jobs and more to do with their beliefs about how work passion is pursued.”

Nice article.  You can read it here.

But the entire premise of the article is wrong.  Wrong wrong wrong.

You don’t find God.

God finds You.

 

2018 -The year vegan junk food went mainstream

As Abigail Higgins laid out earlier this year at Vox, there are a number of reasons for vegans’ relative unpopularity (a 2017 analysis suggested that just “labeling a product as ‘vegan’ causes its sales to drop by 70%”). One is that vegans make people feel bad. “People tend to interpret someone’s choice not to eat meat as condemnation of their own choices, which can make them pretty defensive,” Higgins explained. And this defensiveness isn’t totally misplaced. It’s true that a lot of vegans believe, for any number of reasons, they are doing the right thing, which indeed indicates that they believe a) there is a “right” thing, and b) you’re not doing it.

This article is strikingly blunt.  I loved it.

MillerCoors Surprises 101-Year-Old Veteran Who Drinks Daily Coors Light With Special Birthday Gift — VinePair

Last week, World War II veteran Andrew E. Slavonic celebrated his 101st birthday. The secret to his long and healthy life? Drinking a daily Coors Light at 4 p.m. News of the veteran’s preferred tipple soon went viral, with MillerCoors, the parent company behind Coors Light, quick to respond with a special birthday gift. According…

via MillerCoors Surprises 101-Year-Old Veteran Who Drinks Daily Coors Light With Special Birthday Gift — VinePair

Growing Up Surrounded by Books Could Have Powerful, Lasting Effect on the Mind

The study, published recently in Social Science Research, assessed data from 160,000 adults from 31 countries, including the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, Turkey, Japan and Chile. Participants filled out surveys with the Programme for the International Assessment of Competencies, which measures proficiency in three categories: literacy, numeracy (using mathematical concepts in everyday life) and information communication technology, (using digital technology to communicate with other people, and to gather and analyze information).

Respondents, who ranged in age from 25 to 65, were asked to estimate how many books were in their house when they were 16 years old. The research team was interested in this question because home library size can be a good indicator of what the study authors term “book-oriented socialization.” Participants were able to select from a given range of books that included everything from “10 or less” to “more than 500.”

The effects were most marked when it came to literacy. Growing up with few books in the home resulted in below average literacy levels. Being surrounded by 80 books boosted the levels to average, and literacy continued to improve until libraries reached about 350 books, at which point the literacy rates leveled off. The researchers observed similar trends when it came to numeracy; the effects were not as pronounced with information communication technology tests, but skills did improve with increased numbers of books.

Interesting research findings.  Read the source article here.

Only two percent of teens read newspaper, one-third have not read book for pleasure in last year.  We. Are. Doomed.