Mask resistance during a pandemic isn’t new – in 1918 many Americans were ‘slackers’

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

George Santayana

 

It is difficult to ascertain the effectiveness of the masks used in 1918. Today, we have a growing body of evidence that well-constructed cloth face coverings are an effective tool in slowing the spread of COVID-19. It remains to be seen, however, whether Americans will maintain the widespread use of face masks as our current pandemic continues to unfold. Deeply entrenched ideals of individual freedom, the lack of cohesive messaging and leadership on mask wearing, and pervasive misinformation have proven to be major hindrances thus far, precisely when the crisis demands consensus and widespread compliance. This was certainly the case in many communities during the fall of 1918. That pandemic ultimately killed about 675,000 people in the U.S. Hopefully, history is not in the process of repeating itself today.

  Mask resistance during a pandemic isn’t new – in 1918 many Americans were ‘slackers’

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A quarter of millennials avoid the influenza vaccine due to cost – American Pharmacists Association

New research from CityMD Urgent Care indicates that more than one-half of millennials say they do not plan to get vaccinated against influenza this year.

Source: A quarter of millennials avoid the influenza vaccine due to cost | American Pharmacists Association

I guess these people haven’t seen the following public service announcement.

Estimating Seasonal Influenza-Associated Deaths in the United States: CDC Study Confirms Variability of Flu | Seasonal Influenza Flu | CDC

Estimating Seasonal Influenza-Associated Deaths in the United States: CDC Study Confirms Variability of Flu | Seasonal Influenza Flu | CDC.

CDC estimates that from the 1976-1977 season to the 2006-2007 flu season, flu-associated deaths ranged from a low of about 3,000 to a high of about 49,000 people. Death certificate data and weekly influenza virus surveillance information was used to estimate how many flu-related deaths occurred among people whose underlying cause of death was listed as respiratory or circulatory disease on their death certificate.

Just a simple reminder that in any year the flu virus will kill more people than the ebola virus.

Stay calm people.  And get a flu shot.