Race Ranks Higher than Pounds for South Asians, Hispanics – ScienceDaily

Americans of South Asian descent are twice as likely as whites to have risks for heart disease, stroke and diabetes, when their weight is in the normal range, according to a study headed by Emory University and UC San Francisco.

Similarly, Americans of Hispanic descent were 80 percent more likely than whites to suffer from so-called cardio-metabolic abnormalities that give rise to heart disease, stroke and diabetes, compared with 50 percent more likely for those who were Chinese and African-American.

These risks include high blood pressure (hypertension), elevated glucose, low HDL, the “good cholesterol,” and high triglycerides, a fat found in blood. In the study, participants who were aged between 45 and 84, were classified as having cardio-metabolic abnormalities if they had two or more of these four risk factors.

Source: Race ranks higher than pounds in diabetes, heart-health risks: South Asians, Hispanics of normal weight most likely to have high glucose, hypertension — ScienceDaily

Alcohol and the Heart: Moderation Still Best – Medpage Today

Source: Alcohol and the Heart: Moderation Still Best | Medpage Today

Source: Alcohol’s Link to Cardiovascular Disease Not So Simple — Physician’s First Watch

Source: Association between clinically recorded alcohol consumption and initial presentation of 12 cardiovascular diseases: population based cohort study using linked health records | The BMJ

Lifestyle Changes in Plain English:

If you don’t drink alcohol, start drinking to reduce your risk of cardiac diseases.

If you drink alcohol heavily, decrease consumption to reduce your risk of cardiac diseases.

 

 

Cholesterol Lowering in Intermediate-Risk Persons without Cardiovascular Disease — NEJM

Conclusions: Treatment with rosuvastatin at a dose of 10 mg per day resulted in a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular events than placebo in an intermediate-risk, ethnically diverse population without cardiovascular disease. (Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and AstraZeneca; HOPE-3 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00468923.)

Source: Cholesterol Lowering in Intermediate-Risk Persons without Cardiovascular Disease — NEJM

Source: Blood-Pressure Lowering in Intermediate-Risk Persons without Cardiovascular Disease — NEJM

Source: Blood-Pressure and Cholesterol Lowering in Persons without Cardiovascular Disease — NEJM

JAMA Cardiology – Effect of the Presence and Type of Angina on Cardiovascular Events in Patients Without Known Coronary Artery Disease Referred for Elective Coronary Angiography

This study describes the characteristics of patients referred for typical, atypical, or no angina and examines the associations between angina type, pre–cardiac catheterization stress test results, and burden of coronary atherosclerosis identified on coronary angiography.

Source: JAMA Network | JAMA Cardiology | Effect of the Presence and Type of Angina on Cardiovascular Events in Patients Without Known Coronary Artery Disease Referred for Elective Coronary Angiography

In this short research letter we find further lack of utility for stress tests in the manner for which we are currently using them for risk stratification. The authors categorized patients referred for catheterization without known CAD to groups based on chest pain symptoms of: typical, atypical, or absent. They then looked at their stress test results, categorized as positive or negative, and found that a negative stress test did not help predict those without obstructive CAD on catheterization. Specifically, patients with typical angina symptoms and a negative stress test were the MOST likely to have obstructive CAD (74%). Clearly limited by the nature of the data presented, and the limited information given regarding the methodology in this research letter, it does further raise doubts regarding the utility of stress testing to risk stratify patients for CAD.

HT to Jeremy Fried for the observation quoted above. Source: Research and Reviews R&R in the FastLane | LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog

Intake of saturated and trans unsaturated fatty acids and risk of all cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies | The BMJ

Source: Intake of saturated and trans unsaturated fatty acids and risk of all cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies | The BMJ

Conclusions Saturated fats are not associated with all cause mortality, CVD, CHD, ischemic stroke, or type 2 diabetes, but the evidence is heterogeneous with methodological limitations. Trans fats are associated with all cause mortality, total CHD, and CHD mortality, probably because of higher levels of intake of industrial trans fats than ruminant trans fats. Dietary guidelines must carefully consider the health effects of recommendations for alternative macronutrients to replace trans fats and saturated fats.

Stroke Rounds: Long Work Hours, Stroke and CHD Risk Associated | Medpage Today

via Stroke Rounds: Long Work Hours, Stroke and CHD Risk Associated | Medpage Today.

“Working 55 hours or more a week was associated with significant 33% increase in stroke risk and a more modest 13% increase in risk of developing coronary heart disease, compared to working 35 to 40 hours weekly, in the analysis of published and previously unpublished prospective cohort studies from the U.S., Europe, and Australia.”

One could argue for causation given the strength of association identified by this study.  Common sense tells us that anyone working more than 60 hours a week is going to have considerably less time for other activities like exercise and time with family and friends.  Long hours working also can lead to neglect of one’s health.