Drink More Coffee Live Longer? (not really)

Read this article or watch the video before you start knocking down a dozen cups of Joe to prolong your life.

if one observes a benefit in a population associated with consuming a food or beverage, and the benefit is not mediated by the active ingredient in that food or beverage, the finding is likely due to unmeasured confounding.  In other words, I think coffee is in the same camp as red wine: the observed benefits are likely due more to the type of person who drinks it than what’s actually in the drink.

 

Researchers Figure Out Why Coffee Is Good For The Heart

The team focused on a protein called p27, which is known among other things to influence the cell cycle. The team found that caffeine triggered the movement of p27 into the mitochondria of heart cells in mice, and in particular, the migration of the heart’s endothelial cells, which line the blood vessels. How well the endothelial cells were able to migrate, they found, relied strongly on the presence of p27, which again is bolstered by caffeine. 

Read the Forbes article here.

American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR): CRU: Report: Obesity and 3 Daily Alcoholic Drinks Increase Liver Cancer Risk

The report also reaffirms the clear link between alcohol consumption and liver cancer, and for the first time quantifies the amount at which risk for liver cancer rises. “We now have a little more precision on the alcohol-liver cancer link,” said Hursting. “Getting above three drinks a day seems to dramatically impact the tumorigenic process and increase risk.”

via American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR): CRU: Report: Obesity and 3 Daily Alcoholic Drinks Increase Liver Cancer Risk.

More coffee!  Less beer!

 

Reduce DM Risk With…Coffee?

Medical News: Tea, Coffee Seem to Protect Against Diabetes – in Endocrinology, Diabetes from MedPage Today

Drinking lots of coffee and tea every day — even decaf — might keep diabetes away, new research shows.

In a meta-analysis of 18 studies, drinking three to four cups of coffee per day was associated with a 25% lower risk of diabetes than drinking two cups or less per day (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.82), according to Rachel Huxley, PhD, of the George Institute for International Health in Sydney, Australia, and colleagues.

There were similar results for decaf coffee and tea.