Diets Don’t Work so Why Are More Teens Dieting?

Well, my first thought was Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) — https://adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/other-related-conditions/body-dysmorphic-disorder-bdd. But this is merely an educated guess from an insurance guy who has lost 200 pounds and not a trained licensed practicing clinical psychiatrist.

In 2015, 42% of 14-year-old girls and boys said they currently were trying to lose weight, compared to 30% in 2005.

Lead author Dr Francesca Solmi (UCL Psychiatry) said: “Our findings show how the way we talk about weight, health and appearance can have profound impacts on young people’s mental health, and efforts to tackle rising obesity rates may have unintended consequences.

“An increase in dieting among young people is concerning because experimental studies have found that dieting is generally ineffective in the long term at reducing body weight in adolescents, but can instead have greater impacts on mental health. We know, for instance, that dieting is a strong risk factor in the development of eating disorders.”

University College London. “Dieting and weight worries on rise in teens.” ScienceDaily. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201116112855.htm (accessed November 21, 2020). — https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201116112855.htm

And in case you made it this far on this blog post my estimated BMI at age 20 was 53.1. My current BMI is 25.1.

The Fine Print of the Keto Diet: Harms and Failures

Thanks Dr. Joshi for the research and study links.

afternoonrounds

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The keto diet has been widely promulgated as an effective therapy for the treatment of diabetes and weight loss with minimal side effects. Many discussions regarding the diet present an unbalanced view, often omitting studies that show harm or lack of a benefit. To balance the narrative, I’ve written this post that I intend to keep maintained for foreseeable future. Below I present the links to references of important studies that are often excluded from the discussion of ketogenic, and by association, low-carbohydrate diets. I invite you to look through them. Personally, I did not expect to find as much as I did (and certainly not so many concerning side effects). If you have other studies or comments, please post them below in the reply section of this page. You can also share them with me on Twitter @sjoshiMD.

  1. Claim that the Ketogenic Diet is Beneficial for Diabetes
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