Resistance Training Tied to Lower Risk for Metabolic Syndrome — Physician’s First Watch

After adjustment for potential confounders like aerobic exercise levels, doing any resistance exercise was associated with lower risk for metabolic syndrome, compared with no resistance training (hazard ratio, 0.83). People who met guidelines for recommended amounts of both resistance exercise (≥2 days/wk) and aerobic exercise (≥500 metabolic equivalent min/wk) had a 25% lower risk for metabolic syndrome than those who didn’t hit the recommended amounts.

Source: Resistance Training Tied to Lower Risk for Metabolic Syndrome — Physician’s First Watch

Link to the original article below.

Source: Association of Resistance Exercise, Independent of and Combined With Aerobic Exercise, With the Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome – Mayo Clinic Proceedings

Advertisements

Is running bad for your knees? Surprisingly, science says “no”

Source: Is running bad for your knees? Surprisingly, science says “no”

I stopped running over ten years ago to preserve my surgically repaired knees.

Two years ago I had difficulty on the way down from a 7200 ft climb up to Hanging Lake.  Last year I was limited to flat hikes.

Time to start running again?

Stronger Muscles, Longer Life – OU Medicine

Over a 15-year period, older adults who regularly strength trained were 45% less likely to die than those who didn’t. In fact, their risk of death from heart disease was 41% lower. From cancer, it was 19% less. This link remained ever after the researchers considered the influence of other factors, such as age, overall health, and smoking status.

Source: Stronger Muscles, Longer Life

I’ve known about the benefits of strength training for some time.  I try to build in resistance training 2x a week.  Some weeks are better than others but for the most part I’ve been fairly compliant for over ten years.  After reading this article I’m more motivated.

See you at the gym later.

A Little Exercise Goes a Long Way for Older Adults | Medpage Today

A Little Exercise Goes a Long Way for Older Adults | Medpage Today.

“This protective effect appears dose-dependent and is already significant for a low dose of moderate to vigorous physical activity (or about 15 min per day), which is below current recommendations for older adults,” they stated. “These results can guide future recommendations for older adults and may improve adherence to regular physical activity programs and thus their global health.”

Some good news about getting older!