Exposome! (I Learned a New Word Today)

In an extensive review, the team found that the early life exposome, which encompasses one’s diet, lifestyle, weight, environmental exposures, and microbiome, has changed substantially in the last several decades. Thus, they hypothesized that factors like the westernized diet and lifestyle may be contributing to the early-onset cancer epidemic…

Possible risk factors for early-onset cancer included alcohol consumption, sleep deprivation, smoking, obesity, and eating foods. Surprisingly, researchers found that while adult sleep duration hasn’t drastically changed over the several decades, children are getting far less sleep today than they were decades ago. Risk factors such as highly-processed foods, sugary beverages, obesity, type 2 diabetes, sedentary lifestyle, and alcohol consumption have all significantly increased since the 1950s, which researchers speculate has accompanied altered microbiome.

Cancers in adults under 50 on the rise globally – https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/09/220906161454.htm. Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “Cancers in adults under 50 on the rise globally: Researchers identify risks factors and trends behind an increasing incidence of early-onset cancers around the world.” ScienceDaily. (accessed September 7, 2022).

I’ve been cooking a lot this week and decided to give myself a break tonight. Grab a burger maybe some pizza.

Then I read this article.

Maybe I will cook tonight.

Gut Check! Two Mediterranean Diet Studies

In conclusion, these two outstanding studies support the fact that (1) it is not the quantity of calories per se that matters but the quality of the diet and (2) even in subjects of advanced age, adherence to a MedDiet is rapidly associated with different metabolic effects and reduced disease risk factors.

Mediterranean diet, gut microbiota and health: when age and calories do not add up!

 

Eat More Fiber

According to Dr. Sadeghi, fiber-rich foods are generally enough to boost and maintain a healthy gut biome. While companies claim to have packaged the secret to digestion via fermented foods—such as yogurt, sauerkraut, kombucha, wine, and cheese—the truth is there is no recognized scientific evidence to support these claims. Dr. Sadeghi stated, “There are no studies which have actually looked at whether these probiotics get incorporated into the gut mucosa or get discarded into the stool. In fact, we don’t even know for sure they aren’t harmful. In a recent study published in Cell, researchers looked at whether probiotics get incorporated into the mucosa post antibiotic therapy to restore gut health.[1] They did colonoscopies on two groups of individuals and samples their biome. Both groups received antibiotics. One group received probiotics and the other group did not receive probiotics. They wanted to know whether taking probiotics restored the health of the gut faster. To their surprise, the group that didn’t get probiotics recovered the biome faster!”

Gastroenterologist Busts Link Between Fermented Dairy and Gut Health

Link to Dr. Angie Sadeghi’s website.