Feeling Older? Here’s How to Embrace It – The New York Times

Spoiler Alert

The answer is more beer.

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Benzodiazepine Withdrawal Syndrome: Presentations and Emergency Department Management – emDOCs.net – Emergency Medicine Education

Prescription benzodiazepines continue to be commonly prescribed drugs for treatment of mood and anxiety disorders. In 2015, more than 32 million people over the age of 12 reported use of benzodiazepines in the previous year. Of these, nearly 20% used benzodiazepines in a pattern of misuse (Figure 1).1 Benzodiazepines also ranked second among misused/abused drug related visits to the ED by patients aged 65 and older in 2011.2 The rates of long term benzodiazepine use have steadily increased over time. A retrospective study showed an age-related increase in the percentage of benzodiazepine use with higher rates of any benzodiazepine use in women at any age.3 Most of the patients with long term benzodiazepine use received their prescriptions from prescribers who were not psychiatrists.4 Benzodiazepine dependence can be seen within just 3-6 weeks of regular use at therapeutic doses.3

Source: emDOCs.net – Emergency Medicine EducationBenzodiazepine Withdrawal Syndrome: Presentations and Emergency Department Management – emDOCs.net – Emergency Medicine Education

10 Questions to Challenge Your Medical News Savvy Medpage Today Weekly News Quiz: August 25-31

Source: 10 Questions to Challenge Your Medical News Savvy | Medpage Today

I intend to post a link to this quiz weekly for life underwriters who are serious about improving their knowledge base.

I scored 70%.

Should have been 80% but I clicked the wrong button.  I knew the answer but answered the question incorrectly.  I had the same problem in college!

 

Global Nutrition Study Changes Nothing – The Atlantic

The practically important findings were that the healthiest people in the world had diets that are full of fruits, beans, seeds, vegetables, and whole grains, and low in refined carbohydrates and sugar.

As researcher Victoria Miller of McMaster University put it, “Our results indicate that recommendations should emphasize raw vegetable intake over cooked.”  There is a novel idea. Dietary guidelines usually don’t encourage people to prioritize raw vegetables over cooked. Maybe they should. That could be a headline. “Cooking Your Vegetables? Welcome to Early Death.”

When measuring diet, for example, lifelong randomized, controlled trials are impossible. Even if people would volunteer to change their diets for a decade or so—a period long enough that rates of death and cancer and heart attacks could be meaningful—it would be impossible to keep the research subjects blinded. Our perceptions of how well we’re eating change how we behave in a lot of other ways.

Source: PURE, a New Global Nutrition Study, Changes Nothing – The Atlantic

Great article.  Guess I’ll start eating more salads and walking faster.

Slow Walking Indicator of Heart-Related Death

Source: Slow Walking Indicator of Heart-Related Death, Study Finds | American Council on Science and Health

Earlier articles with walking-speed vs death association:
2015:
“5 year mortality predictors in 498 103 UK Biobank participants: a prospective population-based study”. Excerpts related to walking:
– Self-reported health and walking pace were the strongest predictors in both sexes and across different causes of deaths.
– Our findings suggest that measures that can be simply obtained by verbal interview without physical examination (eg, self-reported health and walking pace) are the strongest predictors of all-cause mortality.
http://www.thelancet.com/jo…

2013
“Association of walking speed in late midlife with mortality: results from the Whitehall II cohort study.”:
– Slow walking speed is associated with increased mortality in the elderly, but it is unknown whether a similar association is present in late midlife. Our aim was to examine walking speed in late midlife as a predictor of mortality, as well as factors that may explain this association.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.go…

Hat Tip and thanks to fellow reader John H. Newcomb who provided the quotes and links above in the comments section from the original article.