What is the Infarct Artery?

What is the infarct artery????? And have you ever seen a troponin this high?

We’ll never see a case like this in our line of work but it’s still a lot of fun to read on a Saturday morning while recuperating from a business trip.

Hot New Model

Predicting 6-Month Mortality for Older Adults Hospitalized With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Cohort Study

Participants’ mean age was 81.5 years, 44.4% were women, and 10.5% were nonwhite. There were 266 deaths (8.8%) within 6 months. The final risk model included 15 variables, 4 of which were not included in prior risk models: hearing impairment, mobility impairment, weight loss, and lower patient-reported health status

 

Spike in Death Rates in Young Adults Minnesota

Screenshot_2019-12-05 What’s behind the spike in death rates among young adults in Minnesota MinnPost

That hasn’t escaped the notice of Dan Dahl, of Dahl Funeral Home in East Grand Forks and the former president of the Minnesota Funeral Directors Association.

“The older I get, the younger everyone else gets. I’m 59, and it used to be when I was 35, 35-year-olds didn’t die, it seemed like. It kind of sticks out now the older you get,” he said. “We’re not supposed to be burying our kids, our kids are supposed to be burying us.”

Read the source article at this link.

Obesity Linked to Nearly 6-fold Increased Risk of Developing type 2 Diabetes

The researchers found that having an unfavorable lifestyle and obesity are associated with a greater risk of developing T2D regardless of their genetic risk. Obesity (defined as a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher) increased T2D-risk by 5.8-fold compared to individuals with normal weight. The independent effects of high (vs. low) genetic risk and unfavourable (vs. favourable) lifestyle were relatively modest by comparison, with the highest genetic risk group having a 2-fold increased risk of developing T2D compared with the lowest group; and unfavourable lifestyle was associated with a 20% increased risk of developing T2D compared with favourable lifestyle.

Link to source article.

 

Death by Parkinson Disease

Parkinsons mm6835a6-F

From 1999 to 2017, age-adjusted death rates for Parkinson disease among adults aged ≥65 years increased from 41.7 to 65.3 per 100,000 population. Among men, the age-adjusted death rate increased from 65.2 per 100,000 in 1999 to 97.9 in 2017. Among women, the rate increased from 28.4 per 100,000 in 1999 to 43.0 in 2017. Throughout 1999–2017, the death rates for Parkinson disease for men were higher than those for women.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data 1999–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/vitalstatsonline.htm.

QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Parkinson Disease Among Adults Aged ≥65 Years — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 1999–2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2019;68:773. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6835a6external icon.