New study shows dietary self-monitoring takes less than 15 minutes a day

Dietary self-monitoring is the best predictor of weight-loss success. But the practice is viewed as so unpleasant and time-consuming, many would-be weight-losers won’t adopt it. New research shows for the first time how little time it actually takes: 14.6 minutes per day on average. The frequency of monitoring, not the time spent on the process, was the key factor for those in the study who successfully lost weight.

I continuously self-monitor using estimates of calories in my head.  I have used online resources in the past which were useful.

Read the source article at this link.

The Silent Pandemic

There are no quick-fix solutions, as obesity is not an external problem. It is an internal metabolic issue.

Dr. Rita Nawar Tobias

Interesting article on a weight care clinic in Dubai.  This article is worth five minutes of your time.

Daily Weighing may be Key to Losing Weight

Researchers identified several categories of self-weighing adults, from those that weighed themselves daily or almost daily to adults who never used at-home scales.

They found that people who never weighed themselves or only weighed once a week did not lose weight in the following year. Those that weighed themselves six to seven times a week had a significant weight loss (1.7 percent) in 12 months.

Link to source article.

184.4

Yes, I weigh myself almost every day.

Yes it’s been over 40 years since I lost 200 pounds.

Yes!

To Weigh or Not to Weigh

The National Weight Control Registry has published several studies on the habits of those who have successfully achieved and maintained significant weight loss over 10 years (4, 5, 6, 7). Their findings are based on the tracking of over 10,000 individuals through detailed questionnaires and annual follow-up surveys designed to identify behavioral and psychological characteristics and strategies used to maintain weight loss. 75% weigh themselves at least once a week.

Here’s a short literature review on weighing habits in the processes of losing weight and maintaining weight loss.  Read the source article here.

I completed my annual National Weight Control Registry survey this morning.

For the first time in a very long time I reported a weight loss since the last follow up.

When I tell people I’ve lost 200 pounds they are always surprised and ask how I did it.

Well, you’ll just have to buy the book when I finish writing it.

Scientists identify weight loss ripple effect

That’s the finding of a new University of Connecticut study that tracked the weight loss progress of 130 couples over six months. The researchers found that when one member of a couple commits to losing weight, the chances were good the other partner would lose some weight too, even if they were not actively participating in a weight loss intervention.

The study’s lead investigator, UConn Professor Amy Gorin, calls it a “ripple effect.”

“When one person changes their behavior, the people around them change,” says Gorin, a behavioral psychologist. “Whether the patient works with their healthcare provider, joins a community-based, lifestyle approach like Weight Watchers, or tries to lose weight on their own, their new healthy behaviors can benefit others in their lives.”

The study, published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Obesity, also found that the rate at which couples lose weight is interlinked. In other words, if one member lost weight at a steady pace, their partner did too. Likewise, if one person struggled to lose weight, their partner also struggled.

Read the entire source article here.

I wonder if there is a multiplier effect if you only associate with others trying to lose weight?  My 200 pound weight loss was done on the buddy system with my girlfriend.  It was a long time ago but between the two of us the total combined weight loss was over 250 pounds.

The weight loss was a good thing but it didn’t help our relationship.

 

Alcoholism after gastric bypass: Is it in your mind or gut? » Scienceline

In 2012, a large study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that the percentage of patients abusing alcohol increased from 7.6 percent before surgery to 9.6 percent two years after surgery — that’s potentially an additional 2,000 alcoholics each year in the United States. Since then, a growing body of evidence has corroborated these findings. The longest-running study suggests the effect persists even a decade after surgery.

via Alcoholism after gastric bypass: Is it in your mind or gut? » Scienceline.