Scientists identify weight loss ripple effect

That’s the finding of a new University of Connecticut study that tracked the weight loss progress of 130 couples over six months. The researchers found that when one member of a couple commits to losing weight, the chances were good the other partner would lose some weight too, even if they were not actively participating in a weight loss intervention.

The study’s lead investigator, UConn Professor Amy Gorin, calls it a “ripple effect.”

“When one person changes their behavior, the people around them change,” says Gorin, a behavioral psychologist. “Whether the patient works with their healthcare provider, joins a community-based, lifestyle approach like Weight Watchers, or tries to lose weight on their own, their new healthy behaviors can benefit others in their lives.”

The study, published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Obesity, also found that the rate at which couples lose weight is interlinked. In other words, if one member lost weight at a steady pace, their partner did too. Likewise, if one person struggled to lose weight, their partner also struggled.

Read the entire source article here.

I wonder if there is a multiplier effect if you only associate with others trying to lose weight?  My 200 pound weight loss was done on the buddy system with my girlfriend.  It was a long time ago but between the two of us the total combined weight loss was over 250 pounds.

The weight loss was a good thing but it didn’t help our relationship.

 

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Alcoholism after gastric bypass: Is it in your mind or gut? » Scienceline

In 2012, a large study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that the percentage of patients abusing alcohol increased from 7.6 percent before surgery to 9.6 percent two years after surgery — that’s potentially an additional 2,000 alcoholics each year in the United States. Since then, a growing body of evidence has corroborated these findings. The longest-running study suggests the effect persists even a decade after surgery.

via Alcoholism after gastric bypass: Is it in your mind or gut? » Scienceline.

Stupidity is Worse for us than Either Sugar or Saturated Fat

Stupidity is worse for us than either sugar or saturated fat.

Read this article and you’ll encounter a well reasoned rant with lots of links for further reading enjoyment.  My personal journey includes a significant weight loss experience in my early 20’s.  Over the years I’ve gained back some of the 200 plus pounds lost.  Over the years I’ve also gotten lazy with my dietary habits.  Too many calories and an aging metabolism is not a combination for staying trim.  So I got serious (again) and have dropped 12 pounds the past three months.  I’ve always known what to do but failed to do what needed to be done.

And so it goes.  Change. Adapt. Repeat.

Low Glycemic Load Diet Lowers Diabetes Risk

Eating a low glycemic load diet that also follows the principles of the traditional Mediterranean diet can lower type 2 diabetes risk, new research suggested.

People in the study whose eating patterns most closely adhered to the principles of the Mediterranean diet and the low glycemic load diet were 20% less likely to develop diabetes than people who least closely followed the two diets, Carlo La Vecchia, MD, of the Mario Negri Institute of Pharmacological Research in Milan, and colleagues, wrote online in the journal Diabetologia.

via Low Glycemic Load Diet Lowers Diabetes Risk.

I have a very strong family history of diabetes.  A long time ago I told one of the leading endocrinologists in Dallas about my family history and asked what I could do to minimize my risk of developing the disease.

Stay as thin as you can for as long as you can.

Several years ago I adopted a Mediterranean style diet.  When I learned about the glycemic index I started avoiding most foods with a high glycemic index.

Sixty is on the horizon and I’m still not diabetic.

Olmesartan Medoxomil – Watch for These Side Effects

FDA is warning that the blood pressure drug Olmesartan Medoxomil marketed as Benicar, Benicar HCT, Azor, Tribenzor, and generics can cause intestinal problems known as sprue-like enteropathy. Symptoms of sprue-like enteropathy include severe, chronic diarrhea with substantial weight loss. FDA has approved changes to the labels of these drugs to include this concern. Sprue-like enteropathy has not been detected with ARB drugs other than olmesartan

via Safety Alerts for Human Medical Products > Olmesartan Medoxomil: Drug Safety Communication – Label Changes To Include Intestinal Problems Sprue-Like Enteropathy.