Demographic Shift in Covid-19 (not just for old folks anymore)

An October 2 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report documented COVID-19’s demographic changes. Between May and July, the median age of confirmed US cases fell from 46 years to 37 years. The pandemic’s age distribution had already shifted by June, when new cases were highest among people aged 20 through 29 years. From August 2 to September 5, the weekly incidence among people aged 18 through 22 years roughly doubled from 10.5% to 22.5% of total new cases, some of which was likely due to college students going back to school.

Of the almost 7 million COVID-19 cases included in the CDC’s COVID Data Tracker, about 76% have occurred among adults younger than 65 years, with 18- through 29-year-olds making up the largest chunk. The hospitalization and death rates continue to be far greater among seniors but, importantly, not all younger adults experience mild disease. As of late October, death certificate data show that COVID-19 has killed almost 45 000 people aged 15 through 64 years, including about 6300 adolescents and adults younger than 45 years.

Younger Adults Caught in COVID-19 Crosshairs as Demographics Shift — Abbasi J. Younger Adults Caught in COVID-19 Crosshairs as Demographics Shift. JAMA. 2020;324(21):2141–2143. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.21913 – https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2773055

Please stop all comparisons with the flu.

CDC estimates that the burden of illness during the 2019–2020 season was moderate with an estimated 38 million people sick with flu, 18 million visits to a health care provider for flu, 400,000 hospitalizations for flu, and 22,000 flu deaths

Estimated Influenza Illnesses, Medical visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths in the United States — 2019–2020 Influenza Season — https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/burden/2019-2020.html

No comparison in my opinion. https://globalepidemics.org/key-metrics-for-covid-suppression/

2 thoughts on “Demographic Shift in Covid-19 (not just for old folks anymore)

    • That would actually be comparing 2020-21 flu season stats versus Covid and we won’t have the flu numbers until next year. My comparison is somewhat unfair since the time periods are not the same but sometimes you have to do this to make a point.

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