The Demographic Apocalypse

The ING International Survey Savings 2019, the eighth in an annual series, surveyed 14,695 people in Europe, the US, and Australia, and discovered the majority worry about not having enough money in retirement. The findings show that many people are “sleepwalking” into a financial crisis with little or no savings toward their golden years.

Zero Hedge

The ING International Survey Savings 2019 highlights the difficulties people are facing across Europe, the USA and Australia when it comes to meeting long-term savings goals, such as funding retirement. The survey, the eighth in a savings series repeated annually, canvasses the views of nearly 15,000 people in 15 countries, reveals that six in ten (61%) of non-retirees across Europe worry they won’t have enough money to live on when they retire. This is no surprise when you realise that high shares (27%) have no savings at all. Among this group, two-thirds (66%) tell us they simply don’t earn enough to put anything aside. And many who do have savings aren’t massively better off: 42% in Europe say they have no more than three months’ take-home pay put aside. Results from the USA and Australia are similar.

You can download the full study at this link.

Happy Reading!

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The New Reality of Old Age in America – Washington Post

retirement

Source: The new reality of old age in America – Washington Post

The present standard of retiring somewhere between ages 60 and 70 is not going to be sustainable when half the population lives to 80 or 90 – which is already realistic today – let alone 100 or more. It’s just not possible. If you’re like me, you don’t intend to retire at 70 or maybe not at all, but it’s nice to know we have the option. Future generations won’t.

John Mauldin

I refuse to extrapolate the stories of two families profiled in the linked Washington Post article but will readily admit the author may be on to something.  The cartoon was not part of the article but ran in my local newspaper’s Sunday Comics.  So I put the two together and the picture is anything but funny.

So what happens when you  look at sales figures for RV’s in the US?  Yeah…wow.

I guess it’s pretty tough out there for some.  The sad thing is it’s going to get a lot tougher.

The Retirement Myth.  It’s a new hashtag.

I found some pretty sound advice here.  Scroll down to the bottom of the article.

 

“This Is A Ridiculous Joke” – An Abandoned, Rotting Vancouver House Is Listed For $7.2 Million – Zero Hedge

Source: “This Is A Ridiculous Joke” – An Abandoned, Rotting Vancouver House Is Listed For $7.2 Million | Zero Hedge

Welcome to peak insanity.

You might ask what does this have to do with underwriting?  Great question.  Here’s your answer:

Back during the savings and loan crisis in the US (yes, I’m old) I remember seeing lots of lender initiated life insurance applications to cover mortgage debt.  The applications were made years after the loans were on the books.  One app sticks in my mind.  Like any good underwriter I asked for and received a financial statement.  The valuation of the real estate seemed high to me.  I told the underwriter to decline the case based on inadequate finances.  I was questioned on my decision.

One of the properties (there were multiple properties listed on the balance sheet) was in the same city the underwriter lived in.  I said go drive by the house and you tell me if you think it’s worth $800,000 based upon appearance and location.  The next day he walked into my office.

“It’s an empty lot.”

Hey, at least there are buildings on this $7.2 million property in Vancouver!