Low Folate, Vitamin D Implicated in First-Episode Psychosis

 

Nutritional deficiencies, especially deficiencies in folate and vitamin D, are associated with first-episode psychosis (FEP), new research suggests.

Australian researchers found significantly lower levels of folate and vitamin D in patients with FEP, compared to healthy control persons. Limited evidence also suggested that serum levels of vitamin C were reduced in people with FEP.

Read the source article here 

Access the full study here.

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Linking Sucrose to Hyperlipidemia and Cancer

In rats.  But it’s the behavior of the sugar industry rats that is more disturbing.

Read the entire study here.

Our study contributes to a wider body of literature documenting industry manipulation of science. Industries seeking to influence regulation have a history of funding research resulting in industry-favorable interpretations of controversial evidence related to health effects of smoking [15,16], therapeutic effects of pharmaceutical drugs [17,18], the relationship between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and weight gain or obesity [5], and the causes of climate change, [19] among other issues. The tobacco industry also has a long history of conducting research on the health effects of its products that is often decades ahead of the general scientific community and not publishing results that do not support its agenda [2023]. This paper provides empirical data suggesting that the sugar industry has a similar history of conducting, but not publishing studies with results that are counter to its commercial interests.

Mammoth and Plenty of Raw Vegetables – ScienceDaily

Senckenberg scientists have studied the diet of anatomically modern humans. With their recent study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, they were able to refute the theory that the diet of early representatives of Homo sapiens was more flexible than that of Neanderthals. Just like the Neanderthals, our ancestors had mainly mammoth and plants on their plates — the researchers were unable to document fish as part of their diet. Therefore, the international team assumes that the displacement of the Neanderthals was the result of direct competition.

And yet another result came as a surprise for the scientists: The proportion of plants in the diet of the anatomically modern humans was significantly higher than in comparable Neanderthal finds — mammoths, on the other hand, appear to have been one of the primary sources of meat in both species.

Source: On the early human’s menu: Mammoth and plenty of raw vegetables: Early modern humans consumed more plants than Neanderthals but ate very little fish — ScienceDaily

Take home lesson:

Eat more plants and less mammoth.

Introduction to Protein Summit 2.0: continued exploration of the impact of high-quality protein on optimal health

From The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  All articles have free access with downloadable PDF files.

Introduction to Protein Summit 2.0: continued exploration of the impact of high-quality protein on optimal health.

Protein and healthy aging.

Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids.

The role of protein in weight loss and maintenance.