Nurse Denied Life Insurance Because She Carries Naloxone — Kaiser Health News

Bloodwork was supposed to be the last step in Isela’s application for life insurance. But when she arrived at the lab, her appointment had been canceled. “That was my first warning,” Isela said. She contacted her insurance agent and was told her application was denied because something on her medication list indicated that Isela uses…

via Nurse Denied Life Insurance Because She Carries Naloxone — Kaiser Health News

There are days when I’m so glad I am no longer in a management role.

Today is one of those days.

20 Things Patients Can Do to Stay Out of My ER

When you’re arguing, do NOT tell your significant other that your life is no longer worth living just to make them feel bad. If they call 911, EMS will bring you to me. I’ll keep you until you’re legally sober, even if it takes a week. I’ll sedate you or tie you down if I have to. Afterwards, you’ll get a mental health evaluation, and we’ll let you go home. By that time, your significant other has thoroughly enjoyed life without you. Speak wisely.

Priceless!

Read the list at this link.

HT – nakedcapitalism.com

What the News Left Out About K2

As a psychiatrist, I have encountered countless individuals in the emergency room who come through and do not want help. “What K2? I don’t use that stuff.” They will deny it, laugh it off, or scoff at me. They threaten to commit suicide if I don’t let them stay the night, and demand extra sandwiches and clothes. These individuals have the ability to decipher their options.  If the person’s thinking suddenly clears and there is no sign of physical instability, he or she can just walk out the emergency room almost minutes after presenting. In the dead of night, I’ve had unconscious patients who wake up abruptly only to demand to leave. I have no choice but to discharge them “home” to no particular address, since none are listed.

Here’s the link to the full article.

 

Thunderstorm Asthma

It was only after it settled down that we realised what we had achieved. In a 24 hour period our emergency department would typically see around 200 patients. During “Thunderstorm Asthma,” over a 12-hour period between 7pm and 7 am we treated 296 patients; 208 of them had respiratory symptoms. Of these patients 170 went home, 36 were admitted including four that went to the intensive care unit. The peak occurred at 9pm, when 43 patients arrived in an hour.  It wasn’t until 2am before our numbers dropped below 20 an hour.

Source: Thunderstorm asthma: ‘It was like a war zone,’ emergency doctor says

Here`s why.

Source: Thunderstorm asthma – Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA)