Being present to the ones we love – Oklahoman.com

We all have difficult days and unfulfilled dreams and sometimes need a place of comfort. We have joyful days and want someone to celebrate with us, but if we’re not paying attention, significant moments can be overlooked.

So turn off the television, log off social media, pocket the mobile phone, and if you can’t mute the phone and ignore it, then leave it in the car when you go out to eat. Be present — not just with your ears, but your eyes, as well. Pay attention. Don’t interrupt. Say, “Tell me more or help me understand,” and just listen.

Charlotte Lankard is a licensed marriage and family therapist in private practice. Contact her at clankard@opubco.com.

Source: Lankard: Being present to the ones we love | Oklahoman.com

Daily Weigh-Ins Keep Dieters on Track – MedicineNet

Daily Weigh-Ins Keep Dieters on Track – MedicineNet.

Journal of Obesity — An Open Access Journal.

A two-year Cornell University study found that tracking the results of daily weight checks on a chart helped people lose weight and keep it off.

Sometimes I forget but I try to weigh myself every day.  I keep a log on a Google Sheet.  It is a daily reminder of whether I’ve been good or bad.  Bad behavior is not hard to recognize.  Too many restaurant meals, too much animal protein, ice cream, pizza, beer, etc.  Good behavior is harder but achievable.  Grilled chicken on mixed greens, choosing the smaller burrito rather than the giant version, more plant based meals, less beer.

Periodic weigh-in’s work.  It’s part of the routine ever since losing over 200 pounds.  Boom.

Anne Lamott – Time Lost and Found

Finding time – Sunset.

 

I sometimes teach classes on writing, during which I tell my students every single thing I know about the craft and habit. This takes approximately 45 minutes. I begin with my core belief—and the foundation of almost all wisdom traditions—that there is nothing you can buy, achieve, own, or rent that can fill up that hunger inside for a sense of fulfillment and wonder. But the good news is that creative expression, whether that means writing, dancing, bird-watching, or cooking, can give a person almost everything that he or she has been searching for: enlivenment, peace, meaning, and the incalculable wealth of time spent quietly in beauty.

Then I bring up the bad news: You have to make time to do this.

This means you have to grasp that your manic forms of connectivity—cell phone, email, text, Twitter—steal most chances of lasting connection or amazement. That multitasking can argue a wasted life. That a close friendship is worth more than material success.

Stupidity is Worse for us than Either Sugar or Saturated Fat

Stupidity is worse for us than either sugar or saturated fat.

Read this article and you’ll encounter a well reasoned rant with lots of links for further reading enjoyment.  My personal journey includes a significant weight loss experience in my early 20’s.  Over the years I’ve gained back some of the 200 plus pounds lost.  Over the years I’ve also gotten lazy with my dietary habits.  Too many calories and an aging metabolism is not a combination for staying trim.  So I got serious (again) and have dropped 12 pounds the past three months.  I’ve always known what to do but failed to do what needed to be done.

And so it goes.  Change. Adapt. Repeat.

Yogurt and Diabetes

Eating yogurt can reduce the risk of getting Type 2 diabetes by 28 percent, compared with consuming none, according to a study published today by Diabetologia. Higher consumption of low-fat fermented dairy products, such as yogurt and some cheeses, also lowered the relative risk of diabetes by 24 percent overall, the study showed.

via Yogurt May Be an Ally in Fight Against Diabetes: Study – Bloomberg.

Update 03.28.14

I’ve started eating yogurt every day.

READ THIS NOW – Writing Wednesdays: “Poof Goes the Middle Class”

People are becoming entrepreneurs. The mind-set of the employee is vanishing like the factory where it was born. It has to. We’ll all die if we wait for some force outside ourselves—business or government—to bring us jobs or teach us who we are or how we ought to live.

We have to invent our own ways, and that’s just what we’re doing.

via Writing Wednesdays: “Poof Goes the Middle Class”.

Poof goes the middle class – latimes.com.

A couple of weeks ago I caught up with my old college buddy on the phone.  I asked how his son was doing after taking refuge in his parents’ basement post college graduation.

“Michael’s doing great.  He moved out to Brooklyn and is doing project work.  Very happy, very busy.  Michael has four or five projects on the go.”

Call it what you want – freelancer, contract worker, portfolio careerist.  The employee mindset is becoming a thing of the past.

How Coursera, A Free Online Education Service, Will School Us All | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

Coursera courses are 6 to 10 weeks long, with an hour or two of videos per week. In addition to the snap quizzes, they feature weekly exercises, ranging from problem sets to spreadsheets to design projects or essays, and sometimes a final project or exam. For all quantitative courses, the platform uses artificial intelligence to evaluate each longer exercise, with instant results. Students can keep trying until they get the right answer. For humanities courses, Coursera is testing a form of peer grading.

via How Coursera, A Free Online Education Service, Will School Us All | Fast Company | Business + Innovation.

Great article about a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course).  HT – Mish.

What a Messy Desk Says About You – NYTimes.com

In the study by Dr. Vohs, disordered offices encouraged originality and a search for novelty. In the final portion of the study, adults were given the choice of adding a health “boost” to their lunchtime smoothie that was labeled either “new” or “classic.” The volunteers in the messy space were far more likely to choose the new one; those in the tidy office generally opted for the classic version.

“Disorderly environments seem to inspire breaking free of tradition,” Dr. Vohs and her co-authors conclude in the study, “which can produce fresh insights.”

My office is fine the way it is.  I know what is in every pile.  Now I have some evidence that the way I work is more creative.  STFU!

via What a Messy Desk Says About You – NYTimes.com.