Plant Protein Linked to Longer Life

Plant Protein Linked to Longer Life

Link above is to NEJM Journal Watch article.

Conclusions and Relevance  In this large prospective study, higher plant protein intake was associated with lower total and CVD-related mortality. Although animal protein intake was not associated with mortality outcomes, replacement of red meat protein or processed meat protein with plant protein was associated with lower total, cancer-related, and CVD-related mortality.

JAMA Internal Medicine article (Free abstract)

Note: Study focused on Japanese adults.

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Low-Fat Dietary Pattern among Postmenopausal Women Influences Long-Term Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Diabetes Outcomes

Conclusions

Reduction in dietary fat with corresponding increase in vegetables, fruit, and grains led to benefits related to breast cancer, CHD, and diabetes, without adverse effects, among healthy postmenopausal US women.

Source: Low-Fat Dietary Pattern among Postmenopausal Women Influences Long-Term Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Diabetes Outcomes

Plant‐Based Diets Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Disease Mortality, and All‐Cause Mortality in a General Population of Middle‐Aged Adults

Plant‐Based Diets Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Disease Mortality, and All‐Cause Mortality in a General Population of Middle‐Aged Adults

In this community‐based cohort of US adults without cardiovascular disease at baseline, we found that higher adherence to an overall plant‐based diet or a pro-vegetarian diet, diets that are higher in plant foods and lower in animal foods, was associated with a lower risk of incident cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all‐cause mortality. Healthy plant‐based diets, which are higher in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, tea, and coffee and lower in animal foods, were associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and all‐cause mortality.

Our study is one of the few studies that used data from a general population. Prospective studies of Seventh‐Day Adventists in the United States and Canada found that vegetarians had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and all‐cause mortality compared with nonvegetarians.4 The EPIC (European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition)‐Oxford study of vegetarians, vegans, and health‐conscious individuals reported that the risk of incident ischemic heart disease and deaths caused by circulatory disease was lower in vegetarians than nonvegetarians.5, 24 However, these findings were not replicated in population‐based studies in Australia and the United States.6, 13 Notably, a prior study that used data from a nationally representative sample administered a brief questionnaire that assessed the frequency with which participants consumed specific types of animal food (red meat, processed meat, poultry, or fish or seafood) to characterize participants’ dietary intakes.6 Such dietary measurement may not have adequately represented dietary patterns on the basis of abundance of plant foods relative to animal foods. The plant‐based diet indexes we used in this study captured a wider spectrum of intake of plant foods and animal foods, leveraging the available dietary data, and allowed us to move away from defining plant‐based diets strictly based on exclusion of animal foods.

 

Increased Mortality Risk Associated With Red Meat Consumption

Eating More Red Meat Lately? You May Want to Reconsider That

Adults who up their red meat intake may face increased mortality risk, suggests an analysis in The BMJ.

The analysis included over 80,000 U.S. health professionals (about two-thirds women) who completed numerous food-frequency questionnaires over two decades. Researchers examined whether changes in red meat consumption over 8 years were associated with mortality risk in the subsequent 8 years. People with histories of cardiovascular disease or cancer were excluded.

During follow-up, some 14,000 participants died. After multivariable adjustment, those who increased their red meat consumption by more than 0.5 servings a day saw a significant 10% increase in mortality risk — regardless of their baseline intake.

Decreases in red meat consumption were associated with decreased mortality risk — but only when they were accompanied by increases in other proteins or plant-based foods like fish, nuts, or whole grains.

BMJ article link below.

Association of changes in red meat consumption with total and cause specific mortality among US women and men: two prospective cohort studies

PPI Use Linked to Elevated Mortality Risk

PPI Use Linked to Elevated Mortality Risk

During a median 10 years’ follow-up, 37% of participants died. There were 46 excess deaths per 1000 PPI users in that time. PPIs were associated with excess mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients without indications for PPI use had higher mortality risk from CVD, CKD, and also upper gastrointestinal cancer. Longer duration of use was associated with greater risk.

The NEJM Journal Watch summary has a link to the full study from BMJ.

Still Not a Vegan

Diet rich in animal protein is associated with a greater risk of early death

Heli E K Virtanen, Sari Voutilainen, Timo T Koskinen, Jaakko Mursu, Petra Kokko, Maija P T Ylilauri, Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen, Jukka T Salonen, Jyrki K Virtanen. Dietary proteins and protein sources and risk of death: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2019; DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/nqz025

Marta Guasch-Ferré, Ambika Satija, Stacy A. Blondin, Marie Janiszewski, Ester Emlen, Lauren E. O’Connor, Wayne W. Campbell, Frank B. Hu, Walter C. Willett, Meir J. Stampfer. Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials of Red Meat Consumption in Comparison With Various Comparison Diets on Cardiovascular Risk Factors. Circulation, 2019; 139 (15): 1828 DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035225